Talk:IceCube Neutrino Observatory

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solar vs. other neutrinos[edit]

i have heard the installation will discern between neutrinos of solar origin and those emanating from elsewhere. I'd like a section explaining how this will be done. Doceddi 17:38, 14 January 2007 (UTC)

Neutrinos of solar origin are far too low in energy to be seen by IceCube. Solar neutrinos have energies below 20MeV, IceCube's energy threshold will be orders of magnitude above that.Flying fish 22:34, 17 March 2007 (UTC)


Solar WIMP detection criteria


The paragraph on indirect detection of WIMP produced neutrinos says they "could be observed by IceCube as an excess of neutrinos from the direction of the Sun." Just an excess? Shouldn't it be an excess of 'high energy' neutrinos (> 30 Mev), since from what I read annihilation of massive wimps (in the sun) is expected to produce neutrinos with energies substantially higher than solar fusion. D.F. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.61.212.124 (talk) 20:23, 25 December 2013 (UTC)

Include the detection equation[edit]

Some expert should include the neutrino detection equation with a short description written for the scientifically literate non-specialist. Does the telescope detect via neutrino induced electron scattering? Is the neutrino electron target any electron of water or just the hydrogen bonding electrons? Does (n => p) conversion in the oxygen nucleus with ejection of a relativistic electron play any role? I don't understand why this basic information is missing in so many Wikipedia articles on neutrino detectors.

Don Fulton — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.61.212.124 (talk) 23:23, 27 November 2013 (UTC)

Location?[edit]

The article states that the installation is being constructed "at the south pole". Is this accurate? Antarctica is a pretty big place and the South pole is a specific location within the continent! Is it really being constructed at the south pole, or is it somewhere else in Antarctica? If it is at the south pole, was this location chosen for any particular reason (over any other possible location in Antarctica)? 82.211.95.178 12:26, 22 October 2007 (UTC)

It is in fact, and I believe it's at the South Pole because they have thick ice sheets. --Falcorian (talk) 15:36, 22 October 2007 (UTC)

The reason IceCube is at the geographic South Pole is because

  1. the ice sheet is 3 km thick
  2. there is a large station there to support power and other infrastructure

Coldmole (talk) 04:38, 13 December 2007 (UTC)

Tau lepton or tauon?[edit]

Now that we've had a couple back-and-forths, time a discussion: tau, tau lepton, or tauon? The idiom among physicists is "tau", and this is a physics article. However, that has obvious ambiguities with the greek letter for which it's named. So I'm willing to accept "tau lepton", or at least citations linking to that article. --Aardvarkleg 05:34, 6 November 2009 (UTC)

Formatting[edit]

Some limits on neutrino flux using AMANDA:
-> 7.4x10 ^-8 GeV cm ^-2 s^- 1 sr ^-1 valid over the energy range of 1.6x10^4 to 2.5x10^6 GeV
  reference:
   - A. Achterberg et al, /Multiyear Search for a Diffuse Flux of Muon
  Neutrinos with/ /AMANDA-II/    *Ref.:* Physical Review *D76* (2007) 042008, 31 August 2007; erratum
  /ibid/ *77* (2008) 089904(E), 17 April 2008
->  2:7x10 ^-7 GeV cm ^-2 s^- 1 sr ^-1 valid over the energy range of 2x10^5 to 10^9 GeV
  reference:
  - M. Ackermann et al, /Search for Ultra High-Energy Neutrinos with
  AMANDA-II/    *Ref.:* Astrophysical Journal *675* (2008) 1014-1024, 10 March 2008 

This should be formatted appropriately. I'll do it in the next few days if no one got to it first. Headbomb {talk / contribs / physics / books} 18:39, 20 April 2010 (UTC)

"Electron neutrinos typically scatter several times ???"[edit]

The article says "Electron neutrinos typically scatter several times before losing enough energy to fall below the Cherenkov threshold". Neutrinos scattering several sounds really wrong. What's probably meant is "Electrons (produced by electron neutrino event) typically...", but I haven't changed it because I'm really no expert on the topic. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 80.218.232.235 (talk) 19:54, 31 March 2012 (UTC)