Talk:Ida B. Wells

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Information Inaccurate - Please Edit Text[edit]

There is a serious lack of congruity in this article. A large portion of the text has Ms. Wells engaging in activity AFTER the date of her death. Would someone with a better sense of her personal history please edit the biography?


all this stuff is not true its all lies so dont use it;) —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.126.72.205 (talk) 22:45, 25 March 2009 (UTC)

In the little summary box of her life at the top, it says she lived from 1862-1931 (age 68), but then in the article it says she died at age 103??? which is correct. Also it says that some woman had been president of one of the associations she founded '23years running' in 1899. That means Ida Wells would've been less than 15 years old when someone became president of an association which she hadn't even founded yet. Third, it says she met Ferdinand Barnett when he was president of the Ida B Wells club. I seriously doubt it was called the Ida B Wells club at that time.

Gosh, this is one of the most important African American female activists and we can't get the story straight? Somebody please do some research on the facts. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 169.232.65.127 (talk) 06:36, 3 February 2011 (UTC)

Also was expelled from Shaw and then dropped out to help her siblings? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 190.194.214.186 (talk) 12:39, 26 May 2014 (UTC)

Non-neutral descriptions in text; info inaccurate[edit]

Wikipedia says articles should be neutral in nature yet this piece includes statements like the following:

"Because of her constant complaining and nagging about the lynchings" immediately after reporting on the lynching of 3 black men in Memphis. She was a journalist who reported on the lynching incident and demanded that black people be given the same right to defend themselves as white people and the same right to trial. Neither of these requests constitutes "nagging or complaining."

The piece also misrepresents the lynching incident:

"One night, while Wells was out of town, an attack broke out ending in three white men being shot and injuried. A two sided story emerged: One stating the African Americans raped a local white women and one, less heard story, of unjust acts on the black men by the whites. Without trial, Moss, McDowell, and Stewart, were brutally murdered based on the accusations of the white residents of Memphis."

The accepted facts of the case were that white store owners were upset about lost business and attacked the 3 black owners at their store not that "an attack broke out." They defended themselves and one white man was shot and injured. The language of the existing text implies the attack was unintentional and b/c white people were injured it leaves ambiguous that black people were the target of the attack. The 3 black men were then arrested for shooting him and later dragged from their jail cell in the middle of the night and lynched by an angry mob. Wells account of the incident, cited in the wikipedia case, was widely read as were the accounts of anti-lynching activists that were given in speeches, circulated in pamphlets, etc. This hardly constitutes "less heard story" it is in fact the historically accurate and accepted story.

It seems quite sad that the wikipedia on an anti-lynching activist has allowed such a biased rendition of the incident that propelled her to the forefront of this campaign.


Tazewell Thompson quote, or "the Constant Star section"[edit]

Is that Tazewell quote there just to take up space? What little relevance it has could be better expressed by a wiki author.

I'm not sure if the previous comment was by Jerome Moss or not.... In any case, I completely agree with your questioning of the relevance of a whole section devoted to the play Constant Star. Rather than keep the section, I took out virtually all of it and put it in the article for the playwright, Tazewell Thompson. I did, however, leave a bit of it at the end of Wells's biography, since it seemed to nicely sum up her life, including some things that have yet to be written about. (Sigh). Anyway, I've put the entire deleted section below for anyone's perusal.
I added back in one brief sentence about the play. I think the article needs that. It did not read well without some linking introduction to the actual quote from the play -- if the play's going to be quoted from, it should be introduced. But I agree that the original wording gave perhaps too much detail and emphasis to the play. Also, great to have a link to Tazewell Thompson.--BenJonson (talk) 22:24, 3 March 2010 (UTC)
==Constant Star==
There is a play/musical about Wells's life called Constant Star. Authored by Tazewell Thompson, the play uses five actresses to play her as well as other persons in her life. Although primarily a drama, it includes about 20 negro spirituals sung by the actresses. Of his play, Thompson says
My first introduction to Ida B. Wells was the PBS documentary on her life. Her story gnawed at me. A woman born in slavery, she would grow to become one of the great pioneer activists of the Civil Rights movement. A precursor of Rosa Parks, she was a suffragist, newspaper editor and publisher, investigative journalist, co-founder of the NAACP, political candidate, mother, wife, and the single most powerful leader in the anti-lynching campaign in America. A dynamic, controversial, temperamental, uncompromising race woman, she broke bread and crossed swords with some of the movers and shakers of her time: Frederick Douglass, Susan B. Anthony, Marcus Garvey, Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, President McKinley. By any fair assessment, she was a seminal figure in Post-Reconstruction America.
On her passing in 1931, Ida B. Wells was interred in the Oak Woods Cemetery, Chicago. Her formidable contributions to the Civil Rights movement have, until most recently, been under-appreciated. Until now; almost, but not quite, an historical footnote.
This play with song is my attempt to let her story breathe freely on stage - to give it a symphonic expression - to give her extraordinary persona an audience, something she always craved.

My name is Jerome Moss and I was the first black Postmaster in Holly Springs, MS, the town where she was born. She is still respected there and I was able to get the Post Office named in her honor. There is a Ida B. Wells museum with the greatest Curater, Mrs. L Harris. One can learn a lot from her.

Jerome Moss--13.8.125.11 14:38, 20 July 2006 (UTC) --13.8.125.10 17:46, 27 June 2006 (UTC)

Can we get good documentation of the renaming of the Post Office in Holly Springs? If so, it should be added to the article.--BenJonson (talk) 22:24, 3 March 2010 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Idawells2.jpg[edit]

Nuvola apps important.svg

Image:Idawells2.jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images uploaded after 4 May, 2006, and lacking such an explanation will be deleted one week after they have been uploaded, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.

USER MARIPOOH96 AMARI S

Deleted draft article[edit]

The unsigned draft article in this space did not constitute Fair Use Rationale, and this is the wrong place for a draft article. Deleted it. Please add material and edit on the main page of the article. This is supposed to be the place to discuss how to improve it. It needs serious editing - it is rambling and sentences need improvement.Parkwells (talk) 14:35, 21 July 2011 (UTC)

SUM IT UP[edit]

this is like way too long. just a simple sentence would be nice. since i could spend ours trying to find out what i want to here (and i dont have that kind of time) ill go elsewhere. PS-(I dont need to know everything about her from what she wore all the way to how many facial blembeshes she had) —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.22.205.159 (talk) 22:51, 6 April 2009 (UTC)

Wikipedia has a guideline on article size. The article is currently 22kb, which is well under the point at which we're usually concerned about the article length for length sake. Usually summary information is found in the opening few lines of the article. Of course it would be nice if each reader were given an article tailored to what they want, but we don't have a way of determining that. Best wishes, --TeaDrinker (talk) 23:07, 6 April 2009 (UTC)
I agree that it seems long, in part because of rambling sentence style, lack of concision, and poor organization - repetition of material within a few paragraphs. We all need to work at editing.Parkwells (talk) 14:51, 21 July 2011 (UTC)

Klan at end of 19th century?[edit]

The generally accepted history of the Ku Klux Klan is that the original group ended with Reconstruction and that it was revived in the 1910s with the release of D.W. Griffith's movie The Birth of a Nation. Is this really true? If it is, then racist activities in the era discussed here, although reprehensible, cannot be linked to the Klan.

75.204.213.127 (talk) 14:30, 14 October 2010 (UTC)

This is the generally accepted history of the Klan - it was revived in 1915. I agree that it was not responsible for end of 19th c. violence against African Americans. The KKK was repressed in the early 1870s, but other groups attacked freedmen to prevent them from voting (Red Shirts and White League, for instance.) After Democrats regained control and gradually disfranchised African Americans, that kind of militia violence generally ceased. Lynchings generally arose from local mobs.Parkwells (talk) 14:30, 21 July 2011 (UTC)

Mixed Heritage?[edit]

Supposedly, her father James Wells was the son of a white slave master and his black slave. Bab-a-lot (talk) 23:13, 5 May 2012 (UTC)

"Rhetorical Style and Effect" section is a thesis[edit]

As far as I can tell, the entirety of the section titled "Rhetorical Style and Effect" is a thesis. That is, it is interpretation of facts. Judging from the notes, the thesis is Campbell's, but everything is presented as an objective fact and not as interpretation. At the very least, it should be made clear in the text (not simply in notes) whose thesis this is. More likely, this entire section has no place in a Wikipedia article. If the thesis is the original work of the editor, well, that's even more problematic. Wikipedia is not the place for presenting original research. I'm not making any judgement about the value of the thesis, which seems compelling and is certainly interesting. I'm only saying this isn't the place for it. Matt Thorn (talk) 07:15, 7 May 2014 (UTC)

The section was added all at once by user Womensrhetoric (talk · contribs · deleted contribs · logs · edit filter log · block user · block log) on 2 May 2011. I would favour drastic trimming, and attribution of of the opinions, at the very least. But perhaps just list the current 'Campbell' reference as Further Reading. William Avery (talk) 10:24, 7 May 2014 (UTC)