Talk:Imagination

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Older comments, questions[edit]

Looks like this page could be improved for example, ways to stimulates ones own imagination, imagibation tests, external links etc... actually a link should really be done with :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creativity

What the article previously said wasn't entirely accurate... elvenscout742 20:22, 4 Mar 2005 (UTC)

Could someone provide a link or reference to any research into the evolutionary origin of imagination? Just saying that evolving imagination provides an increase in fitness doesn't cut it.

What I want is information on over-active imaginations. At what point is an over-active imagination considered unhealthy?

Boring[edit]

This article doesn't just need a cleanup; It needs some spice, as well.

I nominate this article "the most boring article of the year" award.


Boredom is a sign of a dull mind. An intelligent mind can always find something of interest. This article is definitely informative and interesting. Read some Aristotle and Kant to get used to spiceless writing.Lestrade 23:51, 5 October 2007 (UTC)Lestrade

And I have a feeling you were the one who added "Fairy Tales are Real!!!" and "For more information, watch Spongebob" That is really pathetic. If you want to make this article more interesting, why don't you research it?


It is a little boring, but you may be exaggerating a little. It would be good if people put things such as how the imagination can be used, if they talked about the problems with imagination, or information about very vivid imaginations. This may including psychosis, wierd dreams, writters block and so on. I would have included extracts of what sort of things people with vivid imaginations talk about, such as the fact that I can imagine what it would feel like if it was so hot outside that the roads turned to molten rock and peoples were burning in the street.


I think the article could be spiced up if there was something like an imagination championship that people could compete for. Does such a thing exist?

Theboombody (talk) 22:09, 21 May 2013 (UTC)

Voted for for "the most boring article of the year"[edit]

When I got Here, I imagined pages and pages about how imagination has helped inspire people like the Wright brothers or even leonardo da vinci. HECK.

Use your imagination and you will visualize the humans that you mention.Lestrade 23:55, 5 October 2007 (UTC)Lestrade

Too wordy[edit]

This article is far too wordy and has too many commas. I have to read every sentence twice to make any sense of it.

== I agree with the nominator. This article is a boring, poorly-writtne piece of crap and if I could I would recommend it for speedy deletion. Smith Jones 00:55, 14 September 2006 (UTC)



Here is the proposal.


"Imagination as the mind appears the...... so wiki failed.


"A person is faced with the thoughts and memories and feelings of experience and the person is to then allow the imagination of all such to exist."

Now if five order experience allows the definition as such why delete my article?


Get it correct or I get to make it correct. --Eaglesondouglas 00:15, 22 October 2006 (UTC)



Plato's Form is translated into the quite unique term a form, distinct from all others words. For lack of a better term it is called Plato's form.

Who gets to make imagination?

Who gets to allow the student to be artistic or predicate patterned?

Who gets to make the article on imagination where all experience is the realm and all possible things expect existence.

Imagination appears so quite British Isles like. It is pathologically written.

So I argue. And the Imagination is to be a source. Abstracted source of wonder.

Yearling philosopher you have.

Imagination without wonder? So your competence is shown. The wiki is grown. SO if no dissent occurs I will erase the current article and submit mine to the editors.

The current wonder for the child is so poor it hurts.

So I tried editing Imagination. It is difficult and the change is far superior to the original.

edit Imagination as a reality[edit]

The world as experienced is actually an interpretation of data apparently arriving from the senses, as such it is experienced as real by contrast to most thoughts and imaginings. This difference is only one of degree and can be altered by several historic causes, namely changes to brain chemistry, hypnosis or other altered states of consciousness, meditation, many hallucinagenic drugs, and electricity applied directly to specific parts of the brain. The difference between imagined and perceived real can be so imperceptable as to cause acute states of psychosis. Many mental illnesses can be attributed to this inability to distinguish between the sensed and the internally created worlds. Some cultures and traditions even view the apparently shared world as an illusion of the mind as with the buddhist maya or go to the opposite extreme and accept the imagined and dreamed realms as of equal validity to the apparently shared world as the Australlian Aborines do with their concept of dreamtime.

Imagination, because of having freedom from external limitations, can often become a source of real pleasure and pain. A person of vivid imagination often suffers acutely from the imagined of perils besetting friends, relatives, or even strangers such as celebrities.

Imagination can also produce some symptoms of real illnesses. In some cases, they can seem so "real" that specific physical manifestations occur such as rashes and bruises appearing on the skin, as though imagination had passed into belief or the events imagined were actually in progress. See, for example, psychosomatic illness and Folie a deux.Jiohdi 22:22, 16 February 2007 (UTC)

WikiProject class rating[edit]

This article was automatically assessed because at least one WikiProject had rated the article as start, and the rating on other projects was brought up to start class. BetacommandBot 04:08, 10 November 2007 (UTC)

Now I am confused.[edit]

So people can actually "SEE" in their mind? I don't get it. Could we have a section maybe on what percentage of people can do this? I am not sure I can figure it out. So when these people think 'cat' do they see a cat in their head or just think the word 'cat'? Could this be clarified? Sorry for the trouble but, wow, this is confusing and needs rewording in places. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Melune (talkcontribs) 19:15, 29 September 2008 (UTC)

This article pretty much sucks in numerous ways, but in any case, the question you're asking has been involved in a lot of controversy: the question is basically the extent to which "visualizing" uses the same mental mechanisms as vision. There is a neuroscientist, Steve Kosslyn, who has devoted his career to trying to figure this out, and has come to the conclusion that mental imagery uses most of the parts of the brain that are involved in actual vision. Others aren't convinced. It's a tricky topic: there are some people who claim that they think in pictures, and others that they think in words, but it's hard to come up with any empirical test that distinguishes between the two. Looie496 (talk) 19:47, 29 September 2008 (UTC)

If anyone cares, there's been a few times when I've been really sleepy, and could think of things, and see them almost as if they were right in front of me. 68.0.86.130 (talk) 23:17, 6 November 2008 (UTC)

i see in my mind, i always have, and when i say see i mean i can visualize landscapes and places, sometimes when im mad i just close my eyes and think. i didn't even know this was something to be debated, i see with my mind and i also hear my "consciousness". its hard for me to imagine what it would be like to not be able to visualize things, its always been apart of my thought process. i would assume that everyone can "see with their minds eye", i mean, isnt your imagination visualizing your surroundings during a dream. when someone says "cat" i both think the word cat and see an idealized version of what i think of cats as. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 174.134.204.43 (talk) 18:36, 16 October 2011 (UTC)

Final sentence[edit]

Hi Looie496, I had a go at rewording that sticky sentence at the end of the article and corrected it according to what I could find on the subject. Still needs a valid reference though -- I can only see old books (that I can't access fully) and webpages right now. Hope this helps ~ Ciar ~ (Talk) 07:56, 17 September 2009 (UTC)

Corection and improvement[edit]

"Imagination is the work of the mind that helps create fantasy". Create what? The monitor I'm looking at right now certanely isn't a fantasy. Yet it is a piece of techology that appeared first in imagination of someone. I'm changing this. And this sentence - "The things that we touch, see and hear coalesce into a "picture" via our imagination". It is actually the other way around.

In Our Time[edit]

The BBC programme In Our Time presented by Melvyn Bragg has an episode which may be about this subject (if not moving this note to the appropriate talk page earns cookies). You can add it to "External links" by pasting {{In Our Time|Imagination|p00548lc|Imagination}}.

Rich Farmbrough, 03:15, 16 September 2010 (UTC).

song title called imagination[edit]

song title called imagination  — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2.25.86.130 (talk) 04:02, 28 January 2012 (UTC) 

The imagination[edit]

Human ‘self’ and the memory in which the ‘self’ remains in dynamic state, are located in the immaterial space time. The observed unit is located in an interval of standing time ‘now’ and it is a static picture, or an idea. The ‘self’ is motivated by the ‘emotional energy’ arising from the difference between two parts of the static unit observed in the ‘now’. The motivation allows the ‘self’ to bring from the memory another picture in the next ‘now’. Change from one now to the next ‘now’ manifests flowing time. KK (178.43.116.236 (talk) 16:57, 12 November 2012 (UTC))

[Citation needed] --Andrewaskew (talk) 22:51, 12 November 2012 (UTC)

What does this mean?[edit]

Can someone try and improve this incomprehensible sentence (I'm justing passing by) --there're probably other similar sentences:

A basic training for imagination is listening to storytelling (narrative),[1][5] in which the exactness of the chosen words is the fundamental factor to "evoke worlds".[6

Rwood128 (talk) 16:17, 16 March 2014 (UTC)