Talk:Impatiens

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Plants (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Plants, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of plants and botany on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

==[edit]

I've taken out the list of plants in the main article, because it is duplicated in the species list, and as it contains the imprecise 'New Guinea Impatiens'. And I'm not sure, but would the list of garden forms not all belong and be better placed under Busy Lizzie. Imc 14:55, 11 Dec 2004 (UTC)

Ceylon balsam?[edit]

The common name offered for Impatiens repens is Ceylon jewelweed. AFAIK his name is not used except in North America; it is called a balsam (as also for the related and similar forms from elsewhere in Asia). Also, they are mostly perennial. Imc 21:48, 1 February 2007 (UTC)

Photography[edit]

The pictures on this page as of 18 May 2007 are rubbish. Superruss 10:24, 18 May 2007 (UTC)

I wouldn't go that far, but it could do with a few pictures of the seed pods (both "before" and "after"), since they're a major feature of the plant.
And Wikipedia could "do" with allowing a goddamn video format that actually goddamn worked... (Grr.) 98.217.178.73 (talk) 22:09, 1 June 2010 (UTC)

Health[edit]

They like to be in the sun. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 58.178.18.38 (talk) 10:48, 5 June 2008 (UTC) They also like to be in the shade. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.165.135.172 (talk) 03:57, 28 May 2011 (UTC)

Jewelweed treatment for poison ivy[edit]

Quote from current Wick:

The North American jewelweeds are often used as a home remedy to treat bee stings, insect bites, and particularly Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) and Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica) rashes, but this seems to be based on little else but superstition.

On the contrary, the juice of this plant seems to be the only complete cure for poison ivy. Other medicines only relieve symptoms temporarily. This comment comes from my direct experiences, and I do not know what the Wick quote above is based on. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.142.130.26 (talk) 18:02, 18 February 2009 (UTC)

Antipruritic[edit]

The article states “The North American jewelweeds are often used as a home remedy to treat bee stings, insect bites, and particularly Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) and Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica) rashes as a folk remedy, despite multiple controlled studies showing it to have no antipruritic effect. [3][4][5][6]” It should state “… despite multiple controlled studies showing it to have no effect in preventing or treating poison ivy dermatitis. [3][4][5][6] Dinaphthofuran-7,12-dione derivatives, 1,4-napthoquinone derivatives and flavonals extracted from Impatiens balsamina L. have been shown to reduce itching.”

[1]Antipruritic effect of flavonol and 1,4-naphthoquinone derivatives from Impatiens balsamina L.] / Kyoko Ishiguro and Hisae Oki / Phytotherapy Research • Volume 11 Issue 5, Pages 343 - 347


[2]Antipruritic Dinaphthofuran-7,12-dione Derivatives from the Pericarp of Impatiens balsamina] / Kyoko Ishiguro et al / J. Nat. Prod., 1998, 61 (9), pp 1126–1129 / DOI: 10.1021/np9704718

A72b75c77 (talk) 13:14, 29 June 2011 (UTC)

  1. ^ <343::AID-PTR103>3.0.CO;2-4/abstract Antipruritic effect of flavonol and 1,4-naphthoquinone derivatives from Impatiens balsamina L. / Kyoko Ishiguro and Hisae Oki / Phytotherapy Research • Volume 11 Issue 5, Pages 343 - 347
  2. ^ Antipruritic Dinaphthofuran-7,12-dione Derivatives from the Pericarp of Impatiens balsamina / Kyoko Ishiguro et al / J. Nat. Prod., 1998, 61 (9), pp 1126–1129 / DOI: 10.1021/np9704718