Talk:Inca Trail to Machu Picchu

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References to be restored[edit]

vandalized text, with references to be matched up. Even before passing through the tunnel there are views down to the Urubamba River, the first since leaving the river at Patallacta. The number of these views increases. After the tunnel the town of Aguas Calientes can be seen, and trains running along the river can be heard. As the trail nears Intipata, it affords views of the "Two Day" Inca Trail (aka "Camino Real de los Inkas" or "One Day Inca Trail").[8][10] A small spur of the trail leads directly to Wiñay Wayna, while the main route continues to Intipata.

Intipata (sunny place aka Yunkapata[10]) is a recently uncovered extensive set of argicultural terraces which follow the convex shape of the terrain. Potatoes, maize, fruit, and sweet potato were grown here.[13]


Winaywayna, showing upper and lower structuresThe name Wiñay Wayna (forever young) (win-yay-way-na) is used to refer to both a hostel–restaurant–camp site and a set of Inca ruins. Two groups of major architectural structures, a lower and upper, are set among multiple agricultural terraces at this concave mountainside site. A long flight of fountains or ritual baths utilizing as many as 19 springs runs between the two groups of buildings.[14]

From Wiñay Wayna the trail undulates along below the crest of the east slope of the mountain named Machu Picchu. The steep stairs leading to Intipunku (sun gate) are reached after approximately 3 km. Reaching the crest of this ridge reveals the grandeur of the ruins of Machu Picchu, which lie below. A short downhill walk is the final section of the trail.[10][15] ^ Explore the Inca Trail. Rucksack Readers. page 6. 2006 ^ Explore the Inca Trail. Rucksack Readers. page 44. 2006 ^ Explore the Inca Trail. Rucksack Readers. page 46. 2006 ^ Explore the Inca Trail. Rucksack Readers. page 47. 2006 ^ Explore the Inca Trail. Rucksack Readers. page 50. 2006 ^ a b Cuzco Region Machu Picchu - Peru. ITMB Publishing International Travel Maps ^ Explore the Inca Trail. Rucksack Readers. page 50, 51. 2006 ^ a b c d Box, Ben; Steve Frankham (2008-05-13). Cuzco & the Inca Heartland: Tread Your Own Path (4th ed.). Footprint - Travel Guides. pp. 208–209. ISBN 1-90609-820-4. ^ Explore the Inca Trail. Rucksack Readers. page 51. 2006 ^ a b c d Camino Inka. Instituto Nactional de Cultura. Direccion Regional de Cultura Cuzco. Parque Arqueologic National de Machu Picchu. Ley No 28296 ^ Explore the Inca Trail. Rucksack Readers. page 52. 2006 ^ Explore the Inca Trail. Rucksack Readers. page 53. 2006 ^ Explore the Inca Trail. Rucksack Readers. page 53. 2006 ^ The Rough Guide to Peru. By Dilwyn Jenkins. Contributor Dilwyn Jenkins. Rough Guides. 2003. page 169. ISBN 1843530740, 9781843530749 ^ Explore the Inca Trail. Rucksack Readers. page 54. 2006

9 Explore the Inca Trail. Rucksack Readers. page 51. 2006 ^ a b c d Camino Inka. Instituto Nactional de Cultura. Direccion Regional de Cultura Cuzco. Parque Arqueologic National de Machu Picchu. Ley No 28296

11Explore the Inca Trail. Rucksack Readers. page 52. 2006

^ Explore the Inca Trail. Rucksack Readers. page 53. 2006

13Explore the Inca Trail. Rucksack Readers. page 53. 2006

^ The Rough Guide to Peru. By Dilwyn Jenkins. Contributor Dilwyn Jenkins. Rough Guides. 2003. page 169. ISBN 1843530740, 9781843530749

15 Explore the Inca Trail. Rucksack Readers. page 54. 2006

Patallacta vs. Llactapata[edit]

Patallacta and Llactapata are not the same places but are nearby. Check out with Google Earth by searching for Patallacta (Peru). You will notice to the south another ruins labelled Llactapata. Many people confuse the two sites. Apparently there is another site nearer to Machu Picchu that is also called Llactapata. Check out the article on Llactapata. Dger (talk) 16:49, 21 December 2011 (UTC)

First off, yes its confusing because different people have given the same site different names, and there is anothr site with the same name. That's why I put so much effort into sorting this out. If you look at the edit history of Llactapata you'll see that I made major additions to the article in 2008. Check the photo from the Thomson - Ziegler expedition, and you will see that one of the leaders of that expedition OKd the use of that photo. The photo of the site near the Urubamba River, and "on", or within walking distance of the Classic Trail, was also posted by me. I also have a photgraph taken on the trail, that identifies the Urumbamba site as Llactapata, so even the official signage names are not consistent. I'll send you that photo or upload it so you can see it if you wish. Different guidebooks use one or the other name. You could also check several sources to confirm that the same place has two different names.
The other Llactapata site is not on the Classic Inca Trail, it is on a ridge on the other side of Machu Pichu. Since anyone who wishes to go from one site to another would have to go on foot (or cross the river, take the train, go on foot across the river again, etc. The two sites are nowhere near each other if you are actually there. I tried to craft the wording to reflect this as as on the ground fact that would not mislead anyone who read it. The nearest "other site" is the one one top of the hill overlooking the larger site, and that is mentioned in the article, too.
I'm hoping all of this seems reasonable. Steve Pastor (talk) 17:27, 21 December 2011 (UTC)

The site on the hilltop overlooking the Urumbama River site is described and named here - the nearby hilltop site of Willkaraqay, an ancient pre-Inca site first inhabited around 500 BC.[1]

Although you can see that site (on the hilltop near the Urumbamba River) on Google Earth, no name appears. Steve Pastor (talk) 17:35, 22 December 2011 (UTC)
To see the label you need to click the 'Places' button. I do, however, agree that Willkaraqay is a more appropriate name for the hilltop site. I would like to see a reputable source that confirms the name. So far I haven't found one. The link given above leads nowhere and is a book I don't have. Dger (talk) 20:31, 22 December 2011 (UTC)

In fact the article that this is linked to has the picture I referred to. Note the photo of the trail map and the name at the left, or beginning beginning of the trail. It says Llactapata. The other photo shows the sign overlooking the site, and it says Patallacta and mirador. It DOES NOT refer to the small fortification of the hilltop, which again is Willkaraqay. Steve Pastor (talk) 20:11, 22 December 2011 (UTC)

I have seen these photos and I agree that at least one has to be wrong. The wrong one is the map. We need to clarify the situation. The correct name for the major site near Km 82 amd 88 is Patallacta not Llactapata, which is properly the name of the site to the west of Cuzco. I will make the change shortly unless a reputable source can contradict. Dger (talk) 20:31, 22 December 2011 (UTC)

I don't agree that it is "wrong". Two different names have been given the site, and either name can show up in a guide book. The article should reflect that. Steve Pastor (talk) 23:40, 22 December 2011 (UTC)

Of course it can be wrong. Authors can make any number of errors in both geography and names. The Peruvians that put the markers on the Inca Trail have called it Patallacta. Why should a English language guidebook take prescedence? It also makes no sense to use a name for two different sites that are in close proximity. I have therefore switched the order of the names, i.e., both names are still in the article. Dger (talk) 00:30, 23 December 2011 (UTC)

And the trail map / sign on the trail itself that shows the site as Llactapata? Steve Pastor (talk) 02:03, 23 December 2011 (UTC)

  1. ^ Cite error: The named reference Explore_the_Inca_Trail.2C_p._50 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).