Talk:India House

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Copy edit[edit]

Copyedited as far as end of section 2.2, "The Indian Sociologist". --OpenToppedBus - Talk to the driver 15:26, 26 June 2008 (UTC)

Now to end of section 2.5, "Transformation". --OpenToppedBus - Talk to the driver 09:21, 1 July 2008 (UTC)
Complete to end of 3.1, "Scotland Yard" --OpenToppedBus - Talk to the driver 13:21, 1 July 2008 (UTC)
Copyediting now complete. I have no knowledge of the subject other than that which I've gained from reading this article, so it probably ought to be rechecked in case I've inadvertently changed any meanings. --OpenToppedBus - Talk to the driver 16:46, 1 July 2008 (UTC)
Thanks for this massive help, Cant explain how much I appreciate this. rueben_lys (talk · contribs) 17:05, 1 July 2008 (UTC)

Peer review[edit]

I've had a breif flutter through and noted a few problems which could be adressed; there are very few sources cited in the introduction to the article, I've selected some of the most prominent; the article needs some more images, in order to break up the voume of text and provide some information; the sources you cite do not provide specific evidence, which they should, especially considering they are web links. MasterOfHisOwnDomain (talk) 17:07, 2 July 2008 (UTC)

On the citation issue, I have put down vonPochammer as a reference, but what he actually says is that the house became a "point of support" The problem is I synthesised that from both what is widely known, as well as some of the other info (see eg, indoctrination of previously non-activist Indian students in the Impact section) through the article. I dont know if this is acceptable. rueben_lys (talk · contribs) 18:02, 2 July 2008 (UTC)
On the referencing issue, I have to point out most (except one if I am correct) of the references I have given are books, not websites as you say. However, if you see or feel that the evidence does not support what has been written, I will reword or find a better reference. Please let me know. rueben_lys (talk · contribs) 00:49, 3 July 2008 (UTC)
The only problem I have with the references is that they are not specific; a person looking to further their knowledge in this subject, and seeking out the books you mention, would have to search through the entire book to find the cited bits of information. Put the comment from which you have based the information in ' marks after the reference. If you unsure what I mean look at the references of my own article Prehistoric medicine. MasterOfHisOwnDomain (talk) 15:12, 3 July 2008 (UTC)
I can see what you are saying. But I think the references from Popplewell, Hopkirk and Owen (but mainly Popplewell) do talk about in some detail about the organisation, but most writers focus on the impact and the future impact. I wished to avoid any traces of original research, but I am sure most of the references I have given will satisfy a brief over view, what I have done is piece together the scattered facts. I dont know if this helps. rueben_lys (talk · contribs) 16:05, 3 July 2008 (UTC)
Another comment on references - is it really necessary to have in the list of literature books which are also referred to in the references section? Would it not be better to use the {{Cite book}} template in the body of the article for the literature/refs duplicates (naming the ref as has already been done). That way the cited book details will appear in the list of refs, the literature list can be pared down to list only those books etc that are not used in the body of the article as refs, and it can be renamed "Additional reading" or something similar. – ukexpat (talk) 14:36, 21 July 2008 (UTC)
Thanks for the comment UKexpat. The literature section actually only includes the literature used as reference. ie, none of that is "additional reading". The problem with using the cite book template is that where using the same book for a number of different references, I myself find it confusing and moreover does not indicate (or rather gets lost in the medley) which aspect of the article the focus of book maybe. Moreover, I am not very familiar with using the cite book template, which I am with the harvnb template. Also, I thought it allowes a better template for quoting journals. rueben_lys (talk · contribs) 15:21, 21 July 2008 (UTC)

Background looked good to me[edit]

The Taj Mahal, the most famed monument of the Mughal empire

I think I'll copy the Background section across to the talk page here. I thought it concise and well-written. It gives substance to the idea of nationalism. What is India? What was India? Where does the nation start and stop? This question is still alive in Kashmir.

We don't need a definitive answer on Kashmir, but the overview provided links to articles the curious reader could pursue. Alastair Haines (talk) 07:54, 24 July 2008 (UTC)

Where did Kashmir come out from???:D rueben_lys (talk · contribs) 15:31, 24 July 2008 (UTC)
LOL :) Sure, I agree. You see my point too, obviously. It'd have been clearer had I used the past tense.
That background section was good. The article without it presumes people know the British were administering a continent called India, not a nation called India. A factor that became all too clear as the British left.
I'm not taking sides, by the way, Sri Lanka and India are my favourite cricket teams, New Zealand and England at the bottom of my list. ;) Alastair Haines (talk) 18:10, 28 July 2008 (UTC)

Background[edit]

Delegates at the first session of Indian National Congress, Bombay, 28–31, December, 1885.

The void arising from the precipitous decline of the Mughal Empire from the early decades of 18th century allowed emerging powers to grow in the Indian subcontinent. These included the Sikh Confederacy, the Maratha Confederacy, Nizamiyat, the local nawabs of Oudh and Bengal and other smaller powers. Each was a strong regional power influenced by its religious and ethnic identity. However, the East India Company ultimately emerged as the predominant power. One of the results of the social, economic and political changes instituted in the country throughout the greater part of 18th century was the growth of the Indian middle class. Although from different backgrounds and different parts of India, this middle class and its varied political leaderships contributed to a growing "Indian" identity".[1] The realisation and refinement of this concept of national identity fed a rising tide of nationalism in India in the last decades of the 1800s.[2][3][4]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Mitra 2006, p. 63
  2. ^ Desai 2005, p. 30
  3. ^ Desai 2005, p. 125
  4. ^ Desai 2005, p. 154

Comments from Scartol[edit]

First of all, kudos for all your hard work here – the article gave me a solid overview of a topic about which I know shamefully little. You've obviously devoted a great deal of time and effort to this piece, and it shows.

I've done a thorough copyedit, which will hopefully assuage the concerns raised at the FAC. Please note that I have not examined the sources, content, or organisation of the article in any meaningful way; I recommend having additional editors review those things before re-submitting it. (As they say, measure twice and cut once.)

Here are some questions and concerns which arose as I did my copyedit. There's no need to reply to each one when it's fixed, although of course if you want to discuss any of them, please feel free.

  • This is not in order of its appearance in the article (like the other comments below), but I'd like to start with it: Under Savarkar, the Abhinav Bharat Society and the relatively peaceful front of the Free India Society rapidly developed into a radical meeting ground quite different from the IHRS. It was wholly self-reliant and under Savarkar's influence... This problem was mentioned at the FAC, and deserves some careful attention: What exactly is the focus of the article? Was the India House a single organisation? A collection of them? An amorphous and constantly-changing group of people loosely gathered later under one name? Nailing this down will make the "It" in the above sentence much less difficult to comprehend. (Also, was the IHRS not "wholly self-reliant"? The article doesn't suggest this, so it may need mention earlier, in some way.)
  • Is "British committee of the Congress" really capitalised like that, or did we miss a C? I see that sometimes it's capitalised and sometimes not. Let's make it consistent throughout.
  • "India House" and "the India House" also appear alternately in the article. Please let's pick one and standardise.
  • Cama herself was a resourceful woman... Sounds like POV. Let's stick to facts, or say: "Cama was described as a resourceful woman...".
  • With the foundations of the IHRS, Krishna Varma began a scheme for scholarships... Does this mean: "After the creation of the IHRS..." or "Using the monetary resources of the IHRS..."? Please change wording to more clearly indicate meaning.
  • The bit about the scholarships seems oddly placed in the Indian Sociologist section. How about moving it to the end of the prior section?
  • It's not sensible to say "The TIS", since the T is for The. It's like saying "ATM machine".
  • ...Valentine Chirol, editor of The Times, accused Krishna Varma of preaching "disloyal sentiments" to Indian students, and demanded his prosecution. Was preaching "disloyal sentiments" a crime? I'd like to have a link to the law he is supposed to have broken.
  • ...an admirer of Mazzini and a protégé of Tilak... We should get a short (2-4 words) description of each of these people.
  • His efforts at the time were devoted to nationalist writings, organising public meetings and demonstrations, and initiating the secret society of Abhinav Bharat Mandal. This sentence uses the serial comma, and it's not used elsewhere – I recommend going through the whole article and making it consistent throughout, one way or the other. (In this sentence, I would recommend semicolons between the phrases, since ons is a compound item.)
  • Did Savarkar acquire the house itself when Krishna Varma departed? It would be good to have some info on the legal status of the building itself.
  • It emphasised actions of self-sacrifice by its members which were to be directed towards India. This is unclear. Does it mean the actions advertised in India, or that the members were supposed to be thinking of India while sacrificing?
  • I reworded the last paragraph of "Transformation". Please check to make sure I didn't make anything inaccurate.
  • Savarkar's elder brother Ganesh was arrested in India in June that year, and was subsequently tried and transported for life for publication of seditionist literature. "transported for life" is an odd phrase; it implies he was moved around constantly for the rest of his life. Maybe "imprisoned for life"?
  • It was further suggested that Dhingra's intended target was John Morley, the Secretary of State for India himself. Avoid the passive voice whenever possible. Who suggested this? (Indian intelligence sources were the topic of the previous sentence – if they're being referenced here, best to say: "These sources further suggested...")
  • The use of a word like "extremists" in quotation marks signals a POV use of the term. In general, it's best to use a direct quote about how they were perceived at the time: "The arrival of XXX and XXX in London further stirred the matter, since they had been called "[insert quote here]" by the XXX Times."
  • Passive voice constructions like "It is believed that..." are generally not preferred, except in rare circumstances. (See English passive voice.) If the information is now accepted as the true event, just skip over the phrase "It is believed that" – in this case, you can just say: "M.P.T. Acharya was at this time instructed by V.V.S. Iyer and V.D. Savarkar to set himself up as an informer to Scotland Yard..." If someone disputes it, they can go to your source. (Sometimes if the evidence doesn't conclusively point to this as fact, you'll need to add a qualifier, but a word like "likely" or "probably" is still preferable to the passive voice option.)
  • Barkatullah himself had been closely associated with Krishna Varma during his earlier stay in London, and his subsequent career in Japan put him at the heart of Indian political activities there. The uses of "his" are getting unclear here. Please reword to clarify the phrase "his subsequent career".
  • An "India House" was founded in Manhattan... Why is this the only India House in quotation marks?
  • The foundation of the counter-intelligence operation was an intelligence organisation established in London in 1910... Operations are usually not organisations. "the counter-intelligence operation" is confusing at the end of an article which discusses a number of such operations. Could you specify? How about the following:
In January 1910 the Superintendent of Police at Bombay was reassigned to the India Office in London, where he established the Indian Political Intelligence Office.
  • ...it was distinct from Gandhian devotionalism,[1] and acquired the support of a somewhat chauvinist mass movement. This last bit is pretty POV. Let's stick to facts. (Maybe: "...acquired the support of a mass movement advocating XXX.")
  • It charted the latter's approach to State, Society and Colonialism... Are these capitalised for a reason? In general discourse they should not be.
  • A number of Spencerian ideas featured prominently in Savarkar's works well into his political writings and works with the Hindu Mahasabha. Unclear. I assume it means "featured prominently in Savarkar's work throughout his career"?

Good luck with the article, and let me know if you have any questions! – Scartol • Tok 15:02, 28 July 2008 (UTC)

This completely escaped my notice, gimme half an hour to sort through the correctable stuff and I'll clarify anything that can be clarified after that. rueben_lys (talk · contribs) 00:32, 4 August 2008 (UTC)

Scartol, I'll explain the recommendations I didn't implement, and explain to you afew more things. But I gotta do it tomorrow. Really gotta run. rueben_lys (talk · contribs) 01:24, 4 August 2008 (UTC)


Reply to Scartol's comments[edit]

  • This is not in order of its appearance in the article (like the other comments below), but I'd like to start with it: Under Savarkar, the Abhinav Bharat Society and the relatively peaceful front of the Free India Society rapidly developed into a radical meeting ground quite different from the IHRS. It was wholly self-reliant and under Savarkar's influence... This problem was mentioned at the FAC, and deserves some careful attention: What exactly is the focus of the article? Was the India House a single organisation? A collection of them? An amorphous and constantly-changing group of people loosely gathered later under one name? Nailing this down will make the "It" in the above sentence much less difficult to comprehend. (Also, was the IHRS not "wholly self-reliant"? The article doesn't suggest this, so it may need mention earlier, in some way.)
    • I think this has been clarified now.
  • Is "British committee of the Congress" really capitalised like that, or did we miss a C? I see that sometimes it's capitalised and sometimes not. Let's make it consistent throughout.
    • "committee" C capitalised.
  • "India House" and "the India House" also appear alternately in the article. Please let's pick one and standardise.
    • "India House" now.
  • Cama herself was a resourceful woman... Sounds like POV. Let's stick to facts, or say: "Cama was described as a resourceful woman...".
    • Sentence changed as appropriate.
  • With the foundations of the IHRS, Krishna Varma began a scheme for scholarships... Does this mean: "After the creation of the IHRS..." or "Using the monetary resources of the IHRS..."? Please change wording to more clearly indicate meaning.
    • I have explained this now, please let me know if this might still need clarified.
  • The bit about the scholarships seems oddly placed in the Indian Sociologist section. How about moving it to the end of the prior section?
    • Shifted.
  • It's not sensible to say "The TIS", since the T is for The. It's like saying "ATM machine".
    • TIS throughout now, in fact it was probably the last editor who did the hardwork.
  • ...Valentine Chirol, editor of The Times, accused Krishna Varma of preaching "disloyal sentiments" to Indian students, and demanded his prosecution. Was preaching "disloyal sentiments" a crime? I'd like to have a link to the law he is supposed to have broken.
    • I am not entirely sure what law in particular that Chirol wanted Krishna Varma prosecuted for breaking, but I am going to take a guess that Chirol indicated that Krishna Varma was engaging in Sedition and/or treason by preaching revolution and violence in the Emperor's possession. Note that freedom of press and speech in Britain meant preaching itself was probably not a crime, as may be clear from the fact that a John Morley's approach. TIS couldn't be banned in Britain even after it was banned in India. But the fact that violence was happening in India and maybe linked to SKV's views and works meant he was inciting or engaing in treachorous act. This is my take, but I dont know for sure what law Chirol wanted SKV prosecuted under. That he did press for it, and that too surrounding the latter's work and views on TIS is confirmed by a number of sources. The other thing is that Chirol's 1910 book "Indian unrest" is peppered with the term "sedition" with regards to India and violence, so I think in all fairness, he refers to both radical nationalism (ie, movement for independence, not dominion status- which to him is sedition) and revolutionary violence as a conjugate. But here we're crossing over to WP:OR.
  • ...an admirer of Mazzini and a protégé of Tilak... We should get a short (2-4 words) description of each of these people.
    • I have linked Guisseppe Mazzini in full now, although only saying he was a philosopher is half the story, but I didn't wish to repeat the word "nationalist" since it appears more appropriate to the context if mentioned with Tilak. Let me know if the reword seems convoluted, suggestions welcome.
  • His efforts at the time were devoted to nationalist writings, organising public meetings and demonstrations, and initiating the secret society of Abhinav Bharat Mandal. This sentence uses the serial comma, and it's not used elsewhere – I recommend going through the whole article and making it consistent throughout, one way or the other. (In this sentence, I would recommend semicolons between the phrases, since ons is a compound item.)
    • Let me know if the reword appears appropriate now.
  • Did Savarkar acquire the house itself when Krishna Varma departed? It would be good to have some info on the legal status of the building itself.
    • I dont know any work that discusses the legal status of the house, since all focus on the house as a loose organisation of nationalist societies and individuals. However, I am fairly certain Savarkar did not acquire the house since it would most probably be registered to the IHRS. What the paragraph should imply is that Savarkar emerged the leader among India House residents/members.
  • It emphasised actions of self-sacrifice by its members which were to be directed towards India. This is unclear. Does it mean the actions advertised in India, or that the members were supposed to be thinking of India while sacrificing?
    • I am hoping this is clear now.
  • I reworded the last paragraph of "Transformation". Please check to make sure I didn't make anything inaccurate.
  • Why does the article have no image of Krishna Varma or Savarkar?
    • There is one image of Savarkar in the collage at the very top. I haven't found an image of SKV in PD or has a clear copyright info. I will ask Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan for some help soon.
  • Savarkar's elder brother Ganesh was arrested in India in June that year, and was subsequently tried and transported for life for publication of seditionist literature. "transported for life" is an odd phrase; it implies he was moved around constantly for the rest of his life. Maybe "imprisoned for life"?
    • This is now clarified. I realise this might seem odd, but in (British) India, transported for life is synonymous with incarceration at the Cellular Jail (the infamous Kaalapani).
  • It was further suggested that Dhingra's intended target was John Morley, the Secretary of State for India himself. Avoid the passive voice whenever possible. Who suggested this? (Indian intelligence sources were the topic of the previous sentence – if they're being referenced here, best to say: "These sources further suggested...")
    • Sorted I think.
  • The use of a word like "extremists" in quotation marks signals a POV use of the term. In general, it's best to use a direct quote about how they were perceived at the time: "The arrival of XXX and XXX in London further stirred the matter, since they had been called "[insert quote here]" by the XXX Times."
    • Quotes removed. However, I should point, it was quoted because B.C. Pal is the same Pal as of the Lal-Bal-Pal, and he was more a political leader than a leader of a revolution, which makes him a radical politician than extremist, but the book I used (Popplewell) describes him as exptremist, so hey...
  • Passive voice constructions like "It is believed that..." are generally not preferred, except in rare circumstances. (See English passive voice.) If the information is now accepted as the true event, just skip over the phrase "It is believed that" – in this case, you can just say: "M.P.T. Acharya was at this time instructed by V.V.S. Iyer and V.D. Savarkar to set himself up as an informer to Scotland Yard..." If someone disputes it, they can go to your source. (Sometimes if the evidence doesn't conclusively point to this as fact, you'll need to add a qualifier, but a word like "likely" or "probably" is still preferable to the passive voice option.)
    • I will look through in a day or two.
  • Barkatullah himself had been closely associated with Krishna Varma during his earlier stay in London, and his subsequent career in Japan put him at the heart of Indian political activities there. The uses of "his" are getting unclear here. Please reword to clarify the phrase "his subsequent career".
    • Sorted I think.
  • An "India House" was founded in Manhattan... Why is this the only India House in quotation marks?
    • I am not sure, I think I put it there to emphasise it followed on the footsteps, or rather, literally copied the name, of the London India House. I'll change this in a second.
  • The foundation of the counter-intelligence operation was an intelligence organisation established in London in 1910... Operations are usually not organisations. "the counter-intelligence operation" is confusing at the end of an article which discusses a number of such operations. Could you specify? How about the following:
In January 1910 the Superintendent of Police at Bombay was reassigned to the India Office in London, where he established the Indian Political Intelligence Office.
    • Sorted I think.
  • ...it was distinct from Gandhian devotionalism,[1] and acquired the support of a somewhat chauvinist mass movement. This last bit is pretty POV. Let's stick to facts. (Maybe: "...acquired the support of a mass movement advocating XXX.")
    • The "chauvnism" is suggested by the author I referenced. That is too controversial a term or phrase to be put there otherwise. But I though it was also neccessary to have it there to emphasis that it was different from Gandhian practice (which at the end of the day bears on the history and analysis of the Indian independence movement and how or why Gandhi had pan-Indian appeal).
  • It charted the latter's approach to State, Society and Colonialism... Are these capitalised for a reason? In general discourse they should not be.
    • Yes, the terms are used here as nouns, ie the concepts and what have you. I had them wikilinked earlier, but undid them to avoid overlinking.
  • A number of Spencerian ideas featured prominently in Savarkar's works well into his political writings and works with the Hindu Mahasabha. Unclear. I assume it means "featured prominently in Savarkar's work throughout his career"?
    • Well, I dont know how to describe this, but Spencer's thoughts only find prominence in Savarkar's written works, and the Savarkar did not embark (as far as I am aware) on a political career. He associated with the Hindu Mahasabha strongly, but this was by not his only or even central works. If you can suggest a better phrase, I'll be happy to put that in place.
  • My concern is with the phrase "works well into..." I think my proposed revision works, but I'll leave it up to you (or a third opinion).– Scartol • Tok 14:08, 5 August 2008 (UTC)

I hope this does justice to the effort you put into this article. rueben_lys (talk · contribs) 12:59, 4 August 2008 (UTC)

You're joking – you're the one who's put in all the effort. =) These repairs look good. I de-capitalised state, society and colonialism, because – discussed as concepts or not, they really shouldn't be capitalised. The Manhattan India House is still in quotes – intentionally? (Without a short explanation why, this may still throw some readers. I recognize that perhaps it wasn't an official satellite organisation, but I feel that it needs a bit of explanation.)
I worry that the "chauvanism" claim might be flagged as POV – how about "of a mass movement frequently described as chauvanist"? Otherwise, all systems appear to be Go. Good luck with it, and let me know if you have any other questions. – Scartol • Tok 14:08, 5 August 2008 (UTC)

Ruhrfisch comments[edit]

I think this looks much better - good work all around. Here are a few things I noticed rereading it

  • The lead says Scotland Yard began investigating India House aftert the assasination, but the Indian Home Rule Society section says detectives investigated it then (much earlier). The Culmination section also says investigations began in 1909 before the assasination. Which is it?
  • In the Savarkar section, it says in the second sentence of the section An admirer of the Italian nationalist philosopher Giuseppe Mazzini and a protégé of the radical Indian leader Bal Gangadhar Tilak,[4][34][35] Savarkar was associated ... then the last sentence of the same paragraph says He kept in touch with the movement in India through his brother Babarao Ganesh Savarkar; through him, Savarkar's work was discovered by the extremist Indian Congress leaders of the time, including B.G. Tilak. Tilak is linked both times (overlinked - delink the second one). More importantly, these sentences seem to contradict each other - did Savarkar show up in London as a protege of Tilak, OR did Tilak discover Savarkar through his work there? I think maybe Tilak knew him before, then learned of his work at India House, but if this could be made clearer, that would be helpful
  • Is it "Abhinav Bharat Society" or is it "Abhinav Bharat Society"? Both are used
  • In American English, outhouse can mean "latrine" - is this what is meant in The outhouse of India House was converted to a "war workshop" where chemistry students ...?
  • Is overtaken meant or taken over in By 1908, the India House group had overtaken the London Indian Society, the largest association of Indians in London ...? They do not mean the same thing.

Hope this helps, Ruhrfisch ><>°° 13:09, 10 August 2008 (UTC)

Reply to Ruhrfisch[edit]

I think this looks much better - good work all around. Here are a few things I noticed rereading it

  • The lead says Scotland Yard began investigating India House aftert the assasination, but the Indian Home Rule Society section says detectives investigated it then (much earlier). The Culmination section also says investigations began in 1909 before the assasination. Which is it?
    • I am not sure how to clarify this. The 1909 investigation was one in particular, and a very thorough one, which ultimately led to unravelling of the organisation. The ones before that were more surveillance. I cant find the best words to describe this, but India house was definitely noticed by Scotland Yard as early as 1907 (per text)
      • I reread the lead and it seems clearer now, thanks Ruhrfisch ><>°° 00:11, 15 August 2008 (UTC)
  • In the Savarkar section, it says in the second sentence of the section An admirer of the Italian nationalist philosopher Giuseppe Mazzini and a protégé of the radical Indian leader Bal Gangadhar Tilak,[4][34][35] Savarkar was associated ... then the last sentence of the same paragraph says He kept in touch with the movement in India through his brother Babarao Ganesh Savarkar; through him, Savarkar's work was discovered by the extremist Indian Congress leaders of the time, including B.G. Tilak. Tilak is linked both times (overlinked - delink the second one). More importantly, these sentences seem to contradict each other - did Savarkar show up in London as a protege of Tilak, OR did Tilak discover Savarkar through his work there? I think maybe Tilak knew him before, then learned of his work at India House, but if this could be made clearer, that would be helpful
    • Savarkar knew Tilak in India, and in fact the latter was responsible for Savarkar being able to obtain Krishna Varma's scholarship in the first place. What the sentence should imply is that Savarkar's works in London "found their way" to Tilak in India through VDS's brother. I'll try to clarify this, but alternate phrases welcome.
      • Again it now reads much better - I think the problem before was "discovered", which implies he did not know of him or his work before. Thanks, Ruhrfisch ><>°° 00:11, 15 August 2008 (UTC)
  • Is it "Abhinav Bharat Society" or is it "Abhinav Bharat Society"? Both are used
    • It should be Abhinav Bharat, I'll rectify this in a few minutes.
  • In American English, outhouse can mean "latrine" - is this what is meant in The outhouse of India House was converted to a "war workshop" where chemistry students ...?
    • I didn't know this. I think here it means something similar to a shed, or rather, a small building adjoining the main building. Other terminology will be welcome.
      • Outbuilding is fine - I looked up "outhouse" in an American thesaurus and it listed latrine ;-) Ruhrfisch ><>°° 00:11, 15 August 2008 (UTC)
  • Is overtaken meant or taken over in By 1908, the India House group had overtaken the London Indian Society, the largest association of Indians in London ...? They do not mean the same thing.
    • Both are factually correct, I'll think of a better way to put this forward.
      • Again this reads better now with overtaken in the first sentence and taken over in the second, Ruhrfisch ><>°° 00:11, 15 August 2008 (UTC)

Thanks for the help. rueben_lys (talk · contribs) 13:23, 11 August 2008 (UTC)

Copyedit[edit]

Hello, this one just failed due to some copyediting issues. I was sad as it was a fascinating read and so close. I will ask a person or two to see if they can help, and hopefully it can be renominated. Cheers, Casliber (talk · contribs) 11:34, 20 September 2008 (UTC)

I have now copy-edited the first four paragraphs. Pretty much every paragraph needs to be extensively rewritten. There is lots of good information here, but the style is too convoluted, with too much passive voice and needless and awkward phrasing. It resembles the style of undergrad seminar regurgitation of textbooks. I'll be happy to continue this as a favour to Casliber when I can. Until the prose is properly polished, this should not return as an FAC.

To the editors who have contributed to this: I knew nothing of this topic and I found it very interesting and well-referenced and deserving of FA in its substance. Eusebeus (talk) 18:15, 20 September 2008 (UTC)

Thanks for the helpful comments and contributions. The article may have to be edited a bit per the comments especially in the last FAC. Nonetheless, cheers guys rueben_lys (talk · contribs) 13:35, 21 September 2008 (UTC)

File:India House collage2.jpg Nominated for speedy Deletion[edit]

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This notification is provided by a Bot --CommonsNotificationBot (talk) 08:15, 3 December 2011 (UTC)

  1. ^ Cite error: The named reference Bhatt83 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).