Talk:Indian national calendar

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Yamara 18:13, 14 February 2008 (UTC)

Discussion[edit]

On the template of the calendars we can read: «Shaka Samvat», and here we read «Indian national calendar (sometimes called Saka calendar)». What is the correct spelling Shaka or Saka? Pasqual (ca) · CUT 20:10, 29 December 2006 (UTC)

Issues with the Saka Calendar (pre 1957)[edit]

Dear sirs,

Owing to the fact that the Saka Calendar page does not exist or has been deleted and redirected to the Saka Era I must state my points on this page.

1. James Princep seems to be the only one who made tables converting from Samvat to Saka years. He states that all the Saka calendars have different epoch years. Bali - 81 AD, Java 74 AD. In the same information he gives intercalary months [from Useful Tables, Forming an Appendix to the Journal of the Asiatic...]

2. Raffles in his history states the sandinika began 78 AD. He does not actually say the epoch began then. William Wilson Hunter on p216 of 'Orissa' points this difference also.

3. Nirmal Chandra Lahiri gives an offset calculation based on the year beginning in April.

4. All of this however does not ignore that fact that no reliable description of how the Saka calendar (pre 1957) functioned. The standard academic calculation is to add 78 years. But as the Saka is based on the actual lunar month an intercalary month must be inserted or 13 months used and months dropped.

5. Due to 4 the calculation of the exact translation of Saka to Gregorian or Julian must be complex but at possible at least involving the intercalary months.

6. This is fundamental for interpretation of the Chandrasangkala which are the basis of many Indonesian records.

7. [Oceanie; ou cinquieme partie du monde: revue geographique et] gives a date of 77 AD from Rafles original work. An error in translation? A fairly gaping one considering dates were the same in both languages.

Based on this evidence there is a very real possibility that we have a crisis situation in the Saka calendar being used for evidence of historical dates. There are many possibilities as to the truth here. We must also consider a very real possibility that the calendar was invented by Prinseps as justification for the Aryan saga. It would easily be done as Chandrasangkala dates are given as words in a table whose interpretation is entirely arbitrary. In other words Hindu-Arabic numerals were not used. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.111.151.130 (talk) 10:22, 24 April 2008 (UTC)

All Hindu and Bhuddist calendars use elapsed or expired years, which means that their year 1 does not begin at the epoch, for example spring 78, but one year after the epoch. That is, for the first year after the epoch (spring 78 to spring 79), a whole year had not yet elasped, so it cannot be called year 1, instead it is called its year zero. This is the same way that a person's age is determined—they are are not one year old during the year beginning on their date of birth, but are one year old the year after that, beginning on their first birthday. During the year beginning on the day they are born their age is stated as so many months. All other calendars, such as the Gregorian calendar, begin their year 1 at the epoch, so they use current years. The Indian National Calendar does not have any intercalary month. Indeed it can be regarded as a standardized form of other solar Hindu calendars, whereas lunisolar Hindu calendars all have intercalary (adhik) months. — Joe Kress (talk) 06:12, 13 December 2008 (UTC)

Title Change[edit]

Should the title be changed to Saka/Shaka? Talk:Pisharov —Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.177.156.156 (talk) 22:32, 12 December 2008 (UTC)

No. Too many different calendars in India use the Saka era. — Joe Kress (talk) 04:12, 13 December 2008 (UTC)

Minor Rewrite[edit]

Multiple minor rewrites required- clarify which calendar used("ex. month of X starts on Y" change to "month of X starts on Month of Y in Z calendar"). Pisharov —Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.177.156.156 (talk) 22:35, 12 December 2008 (UTC)

This article is about a specific calendar initiated by the Calendar Reform Committee in 1957. It begins with no other month but Chaitra. All of its months begin on the stated date in the Gregorian calendar. Nor does it have an intercalary month. You may be thinking of the multitude of other calendars used in India. See Hindu calendar for a thorough discussion. — Joe Kress (talk) 04:12, 13 December 2008 (UTC)