Talk:Indigenous peoples in Brazil

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Indigenous peoples of the Americas (Rated C-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Indigenous peoples of the Americas, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Indigenous peoples of the Americas on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

This article has comments here.

WikiProject Brazil (Rated C-class, Top-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Brazil, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Brazil and related topics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Top  This article has been rated as Top-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

This article has comments here.

WikiProject South America (Rated C-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject South America, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of articles related to South America on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

This article has comments here.

This article has an assessment summary page.

Comment[edit]

Are there any objections to the moving of this article to Indigenous peoples in Brazil? I find the word "in" to be more suitable than "of" because the indigenous peoples pre-date what is now the country. Additionally, it is preferrable to avoid any wording that may imply belonging to a country. The choice of the word "in" is currently used for Category:Aboriginal peoples in Canada, ali was bornand articles and sub-categories within it. Kurieeto 00:29, August 10, 2005 (UTC)

I for one would support such a move. Also, the plural "peoples" (not singular "people") should be used in the article title, since the article is discussing many distinct groups, and does not imply these groups form a single unit (and nor should it). In this context, "peoples" is the correct plural form of "people", the latter being a countable noun when used (as here) to refer to an entire populace or ethnic group.--cjllw | TALK 02:05, 2005 August 10 (UTC)

Total Population[edit]

Superinteressante, a Brazilian maagazine, claims there are 431 000 Native Indians in Brazil. They supposedly took this info from FUNAI, which is the Brazilian official organization that protect the Brazilian Amerindian population. PMLF 23:36, 5 October 2005 (UTC)

Prejudice[edit]

"Indigenous man could not be made to assimilate any agricultural or other knowledge"

Besides the obvious prejudice, (Since when are indigenous incapable of assimilating knowledge?) this is contradicting the fact that the indians already knew agriculture, stated before in the article. If I recall, the portuguese introduced black slaves because then they would get profit from the slave commerce, but I don't have time to find a source now. --200.222.30.9 02:23, 25 May 2007 (UTC)

Also, since the article states itself that millions more Brazilians have indigenous ancestry without practicing an indigenous culture, it sounds like the indigenous Brazilians have been highly adept at assimilating. --74.103.150.125 (talk) 05:23, 11 July 2011 (UTC)
Yes, indigenous Brazilians were highly adept to assimilate. Many conversions were political acts - such as the german princes, more interested in breaking with Rome than "finding the true faith" - research the history of Niterói, when Temiminós and Portuguese formed an aliance against Tamoios and French. In many regions indigenous made aliances with europeans to defeat other indigenous enemies, since there were many indian nations here. Temiminós, for instance, turned cristians, and in symbol of aliance many portuguese married their sisters - thus becaming part of the "tribe". These aliances are part of the brazilian formation. Politics rules humans since ever. And by "without practicing an indigenous culture", this is unfair. We do not practice indigenous RELIGION, ou an EXCLUSIVE INDIGEOUS CULTURE, but brazilian culture is formed by many aspects of indigenous, african and portuguese cultures, many of them not perceived even by brazilians. As an example, brazilians take bath about twice a day, just like the indians (europeans take a long break between showers), we use a lot of indigenous words, concepts and expressions, fairytales, food, etc., but since we're in majority christians some assume there's nothing indian on us. Cultures mix and transform, I think it's complicate to treat miscigenation as "extermination", white supremacists use these arguments to say that "whites are being exterminated", it's ridiculous. SOrry for my lame english. 187.124.128.142 (talk) 01:38, 20 July 2011 (UTC)
I completely agree with you, and I apologize for my wording. By "without practicing an indigenous culture," I did in fact mean it in the exclusive sense. It is especially clear to me that indigenous Brazilians have had a huge impact on Brazilian cuisine, similar to other areas of the Americas. --98.114.176.218 (talk) 02:31, 8 October 2011 (UTC)

Legal status of indigenous peoples[edit]

There is no mention in the article of the citizenship status of Brazilian indigenous people. Are they citizens of Brazil ? Can they vote in Brazilian local, state and federal elections ? If so, since when ? It is not clear either who owns land on Brazilian Indian reservations (Canadian English "reserves"). Is it the federal government, the Indian tribes themselves, or individual tribe members ? Is all land on reservations communal land or are there privately-held allotments ? Can Indians sell or lease reservation land to non-Indians ? Are non-Indians allowed to live on reservations ? Does the federal government keep a national register (like in Canada) of people with legal indigenous status and therefore eligibility to live and/or "own" land on reservations ?

All the aforementioned questions should be answered in the article ! 187.34.77.68 (talk) 10:10, 23 February 2011 (UTC)

Religion figures are wrong[edit]

Census of Brazil can't be used for knowing the religious demography of Brazilian Indians. In many cases, the census takers don't actually interview the people in remote areas. They just enter the form themselves using their guess. For example, in the State of Amazonas, according to the Census, 100% of the American Indians are Christian, which is highly improbable since there are some 1,000 - 2,000 uncontacted Indians living there. Also, many of the contacted Indians (like those in Javari) are Shamanist. Axxn (talk) 01:20, 13 May 2013 (UTC)

Some questions of the census, including religion, are asked to limited sample of the population, so it is possible that those shamanists were in such a small number that none was in the sample. The most important questions, however, are done in every house possible. And IBGE doesn`t enter forms "using their guess", or at least it is not permited. If anyone did this during the census it was a fraud and they could face legal consequences if they were caught. However, it is true that, after trying to make an interview in a particular house several times without success, IBGE would assume to that house the avarage of that area. It never happens because an area is remote, it happens because they couldn`t find any person in the house in several different days and times. I only agree about the uncontacted people. I doubt IBGE interviews them, otherwise they would be kind of contacted! Anyway, those uncontacted people are not actually Brazilian Citzens, they have their own rules and laws. We need another source for those people, as IBGE will not count them189.127.150.51 (talk) 00:49, 4 June 2013 (UTC)