Talk:Insurrectionary anarchism

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Greece 2008 Insurrection Vs Organization: This part that quotes the Gelderloos piece is misleading. That piece wasn't writing about something that happened during 2008 but way before that. The piece itself predates that.

As was mentioned before, insurrectionary anarchist discourse also had relevance in Greece. In the 2008 Greek riots the old disputes between organizationalist and insurrectionary anarchists reappeared when there was a conflict "between insurrectionary anarchists associated with the Black Bloc, and the heavily organized Antiauthoritarian Movement (AK, in Greek)...the schism between insurrectionists and the Antiauthoritarian Movement has even led to physical fighting...People with AK bullied and beat up anarchists whom they suspected of stealing some computers from the university during an event AK organized, getting them in trouble. In response, some insurrectionists burned down the Antiauthoritarian Movement's offices in Thessaloniki." —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.230.134.2 (talk) 18:19, 20 October 2010 (UTC)

Leon Czolgosz?[edit]

This article seems to say that Leon Czolgosz was an insurrectionary anarchist, and while his actions alone seem to say he ascribed to that belief, he was widely considered to *not* be an anarchist at all, rather, a sympathetic man (potential mental issues) who actual anarchists (like Goldman) avoided. Should this be written in, or is it unimportant? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 169.204.82.82 (talk) 16:11, 7 November 2007 (UTC)


Definition[edit]

This definition of insurectionary anarchism needs some refinement. As it stands, IA seems to oppose liberal reforms and prefer direct action and informal organization. This completely misses an opportunity to differentiate IA from every other form of anarchism. Added expand tag to article. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Rthunder (talkcontribs) 21:09, 16 March 2009 (UTC)

Thanks for the comment, I agree. Do you know of any reliable source that gives a better definition? Skomorokh 21:13, 16 March 2009 (UTC)
Some material, if it can be sourced, can be drawn from this attempt at capturing the essence of IA. Added it to the external links section. --Rico (talk) 21:21, 16 March 2009 (UTC)
Nice. Is that by Wolfi Landstreicher by any chance? Skomorokh 21:24, 16 March 2009 (UTC)
Honestly, not sure. But then if he wanted to reveal his authorship he would have, n'est pas? If you want to try to work it into the article -- hopefully using good cites -- I'm sure an anarchist audience confused about the difference between anarchism, revolutionary anarchism, insurrectionary anarchism, and anarcho-whateverism will be highly appreciative.
Oh, and here is a better source. --Rico (talk) 22:00, 16 March 2009 (UTC)

"As was mentioned before, insurrectionary anarchist discourse also had relevance in Greece. In the 2008 Greek riots the old disputes between organizationalist and insurrectionary anarchists reappeared when there was a conflict "between insurrectionary anarchists associated with the Black Bloc, and the heavily organized Antiauthoritarian Movement (AK, in Greek)...the schism between insurrectionists and the Antiauthoritarian Movement has even led to physical fighting...People with AK bullied and beat up anarchists whom they suspected of stealing some computers from the university during an event AK organized, getting them in trouble. In response, some insurrectionists burned down the Antiauthoritarian Movement's offices in Thessaloniki."[15]"

this paragraph referring to the dispute between tendencies did not happen during the 2008 greek riots. the piece by gelderloos that is quoted precedes that insurrection. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.230.134.2 (talk) 22:33, 20 June 2010 (UTC)

Semi-protected until October 22[edit]

This article has been semi-protected until October 22 after one of my "friends" (term used more loosely after this incident) on Facebook encouraged people to start vandalizing the page. I have admonished those involved on Facebook. This semi-protection ought to keep the article trouble-free for a bit, and maybe will help those involved treat Wikipedia with respect, considering one of their friends had to put an end to their vandalism spree. Thank you to all who helped revert the vandalism. SchuminWeb (Talk) 07:55, 15 October 2009 (UTC)

Oh, it's no trouble. What's anarchism for, if not to challenge the rules? Lol. Piano non troppo (talk) 08:00, 15 October 2009 (UTC)
Challenge the rules, sure. But this falls under the same scope as these people who go around breaking windows at protests. In the end, what have you gained? More corporations just get wealthier because they have to replace the window, and the insurance underwriters can charge higher premiums - counter to the whole concept in the first place, and looking stupid in the end. SchuminWeb (Talk) 08:10, 15 October 2009 (UTC)
That is absolutely not how insurance works. Nothing about what you just said is true and I challenge you to provide non-anecdotal evidence from multiple sources to back that up. Also, vandalizing wikipedia is simple pranksterism. You lack a sense of humor. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.15.36.38 (talk) 01:54, 31 October 2009 (UTC)
Sad to say but it isn't that far fetched. Modern insurances originated in European merchant navies as ships full of cargo, when sunk, could bankrupt the owner because they were bloody expensive (at least that's what they told me when I started working in one modern insurance company). The system worked (and still works today) like this: whenever someone's ship was lost at sea, the merchants shared the financial losses, resulting in less bankrupcies. And by paying a fraction of someone else's lost ship every now and then, their own business was safe from the forces of the nature. This is how it works in modern insurance companies as well, with one differece - the insurance costs are used not only to cover the damages of customers, but to provide profit for the owners. It is a company, after all. Thus, when more windows are broken, the company has to pay more to replace them, and increase insurance costs to cover the losses. 87.108.22.140 (talk) 06:55, 22 January 2010 (UTC)
I'm smiling, because I did stuff like that in my teens. The vandals did not meet their goals, but they may have learned something about making an effective statement. Social expression in Wikipedia may be as worthwhile as the information itself, in some instances. A social experiment in process? Best Regards, Piano non troppo (talk) 11:03, 16 October 2009 (UTC)
You're welcome.   — Jeff G. (talk|contribs) 13:16, 15 October 2009 (UTC)
Glad I could help! -FASTILY (TALK) 02:35, 16 October 2009 (UTC)