Talk:Internal Revenue Code section 1

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Untitled[edit]

To redirect:

26 U.S.C. § 1 26 USC § 1 26 U.S.C. Section 1 26 U.S.C. section 1 26 USC Section 1 26 USC section 1 IRC § 1 IRC Section 1 IRC section 1

If anyone can think of any others, please make 'em! bd2412 T 15:10, 8 July 2006 (UTC)

Legal Definition of Income[edit]

Please provide this as it is prerequisite to IRS Code Section 1. In this context, that would be the IRS Code definition, or, lacking that, the constitutional definition. From what I understand, the Supreme Court has ruled that income is the result of a business profit. 206.124.31.24 09:14, 3 October 2006 (UTC)

This article is on section 1, which deals only with imposition of the Federal income tax on individuals, estates, and trusts. Section 1 references only "taxable income," which is defined at 26 U.S.C. § 63. Taxable income in turn is defined in terms of "gross income" (see as defined in 26 U.S.C. § 61 and modified in many, many other code sections). There is a separate article on section 61, and you could theoretically add separate articles for every code section that gives more detail on what is and is not included in gross income, etc. You may want to review the article on section 61. I would argue that the article on section 1 is not the place for all that detail. For some background, see Internal Revenue Code section 61 and Commissioner v. Glenshaw Glass Co.. This is just scratching the surface on "income." Yours, Famspear 14:15, 3 October 2006 (UTC)
PS: The article already contains links to the Wikipedia articles on section 61 and section 63. Yours, Famspear 14:22, 3 October 2006 (UTC)

Post-script: Neither the United States Supreme Court nor any other Federal court has ever ruled that "income" consists only of (or results only from) "business profit." Yours, Famspear 17:46, 26 October 2006 (UTC)


This section should provide a link to the related "Cross references relating to tax on individuals" which is Section 5 of this part (PART I--TAX ON INDIVIDUALS). NOTE: this section current does not exist on Wikipedia and it will need to be added (I could not find it on Wikipedia anyways). Rflosi 15:30, 8 November 2006 (UTC)

I read sections 61 and 63 (and some sections they reference) and cannot find wages listed. Where am I missing that? Thanks! Ellisonch 23:31, 26 March 2007 (UTC)

Dear user Ellisonch: Here is the key language from section 61:

Except as otherwise provided in this subtitle, gross income means all income from whatever source derived, including (but not limited to) the following items:
(1) Compensation for services, including fees, commissions, fringe benefits, and similar items [ . . . ] [bolding added]

The legal term "compensation for services" includes wages, salaries, bonuses or any other compensation for services, by whatever term used. Contrary to what one might think, most terms in most U.S. statutes, including the Internal Revenue Code, are not defined in the statutes (although of course some terms are).

By law, the phrase "all income from whatever source derived" covers every item of income that is not specifically excluded by some other provision of law. Yours, Famspear 00:48, 27 March 2007 (UTC)