Talk:International Polar Year

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Untitled[edit]

The International Geophysical Year (1957-58): The International Geophysical Year (IGY), 1 July 1957 to 31 December 1958, celebrated the 75th and 25th anniversaries of the First and Second IPYs. The IGY was conceived by a number of post-WWII eminent physicists, including Sydney Chapman, James Van Allen, and Lloyd Berkner, at an informal gathering in Washington, DC in 1950. These individuals realized the potential of the technology developed during WWII (for example, rockets and radar), and they hoped to redirect the technology and scientific momentum towards advances in research, particularly in the upper atmosphere. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.14.246.77 (talkcontribs)

A "year" of 24 months?[edit]

According to the International Polar Year website (http://www.ipy.org/), IPY runs from March 2007 to March 2009. Why is this 24-month (or 25-month) "year" not called an International Polar Biennium (IPB)? -- Wavelength 19:34, 1 May 2007 (UTC)

Commemorative Coin Controversy[edit]

The coin controversy section has been taken verbatim from a copyrighted news account, which was referenced in the section. As this section should probably be rewritten and, as it has nothing to do with the IPY per se, perhaps is should be removed altogether and put into WikiNews. --76.87.145.253 04:46, 20 July 2007 (UTC)

Why not a trial run for outer space?[edit]

Maybe we should consider Antarctica a testing ground for space colonization and treat research there as a step towards the planets (including the dwarf planets) and, if we ever find a way around the speed of light, the stars as well. — Rickyrab | Talk 19:13, 24 December 2008 (UTC)

Add text on recent National Research Council report[edit]

Hi, I'd like to add some information about a National Research Council report on IPY that released yesterday (April 3 2012).

Lessons and Legacies of International Polar Year 2007-2008, a 2012 report from the National Academies’ Polar Research Board, considers the accomplishments and lessons learned through IPY, finding that overall IPY was an outstanding success.[1]
The report found that IPY engaged the public to communicate the relevance of polar research to the entire planet, strengthened connections with the indigenous people of the Arctic, and established new observational networks. Activities at both poles led to scientific discoveries that provided a step change in scientific understanding and helped translate scientific knowledge into policy-relevant information. At a time when the polar regions are undergoing a transformation from an icy wilderness to a new zone for human affairs, these insights could not be more timely or more relevant, the report found[2]. The report concluded that the legacies of IPY extend far beyond the scientific results achieved, and valuable lessons learned from the process will guide future endeavors of similar magnitude.[3]

Any feedback would be great! Earlgrey101 (talk) 14:23, 4 April 2012 (UTC)
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