Talk:Internet

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Wikipedia Version 1.0 Editorial Team / v0.5 / Vital / Core
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Kevin.strong (talk) 20:20, 27 October 2011 (UTC)[edit]

Small edit in History section:

Modification to correct confusing year reference:

"Commercial internet service providers (ISPs) began to emerge in the late 1980s and 1990s."

change to

Commercial internet service providers (ISPs) began to emerge in the late 1980s into the 1990s.

Mis-capitilisation[edit]

Under Modern Uses the first word of the third sentence (mobile) isn't capitalised.

FYI - AfD for Internetization[edit]

FYI - A related article, Internetization, has been AfDed and could use additional discussion at: WP:Articles_for_deletion/Internetization_(2nd_nomination). Meclee (talk) 23:46, 23 April 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 8 May 2014[edit]

In the user section, it states that 23% of the requested language is Chinese, whereas the pie chart claims to be a quarter. Please could you fix this in order to rectify the mistake? Thank you 86.23.99.178 (talk) 14:14, 8 May 2014 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done I've changed the percentage in the body to 25%. Best, Mz7 (talk) 00:25, 9 May 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 17 June 2014[edit]

Please append to the sentence: "The first two nodes of what would become the ARPANET were interconnected between Leonard Kleinrock's Network Measurement Center at the UCLA's School of Engineering and Applied Science and Douglas Engelbart's NLS system at SRI International (SRI) in Menlo Park, California, on 29 October 1969" the phrase ", using Interface Message Processors built by the Cambridge, Massachusetts company Bolt Beranek and Newman (BBN)."

The citation is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interface_Message_Processor.

This addition clarifies the word "interconnected" used in the original sentence. NameNotInUse (talk) 17:20, 17 June 2014 (UTC)

Comment - Wikipedia, itself, is not a reliable source (see WP:WINARS). Find a reliable source and I will do it. DJAMP4444 17:53, 17 June 2014 (UTC)

Suggested addition on impact of the Internet on science[edit]

Change second para of "Usage" to:

Educational material at all levels from pre-school to post-doctoral is available from websites. Examples range from CBeebies, through school and high-school revision guides and virtual universities, to access to top-end scholarly literature through the likes of Google Scholar. For distance education, help with homework and other assignments, self-guided learning, whiling away spare time, or just looking up more detail on an interesting fact, it has never been easier for people to access educational information at any level from anywhere. The Internet in general and the World Wide Web in particular are important enablers of both formal and informal education. Further, the Internet allows universities, in particular researchers from the social and behavioral sciences, to conduct research remotely via virtual laboratories, with profound changes in reach and generalizability of findings as well as in communication between scientists and in the publication of results (Reips, 2008).

Reference:

Reips, U.-D. (2008). How Internet-mediated research changes science. In A. Barak (Ed.), Psychological aspects of cyberspace: Theory, research, applications (pp. 268-294). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. http://chapter12-reips.blogspot.com/
— Preceding unsigned comment added by 178.238.167.206 (talk) 11:06, 12 July 2014 (UTC)
Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: please provide reliable sources that support the change you want to be made. I'm sorry. Blogspot can't be used as a reliable source. —cyberpower ChatOnline 08:30, 22 July 2014 (UTC)

I think a reference along these lines would be OK.[1] The reference is to a book published by Cambridge University Press and not to Blogspot.

  1. ^ Reips, U.-D. (2008). "How Internet-mediated research changes science" (Chapter 12). In A. Barak (Ed.), Psychological aspects of cyberspace: Theory, research, applications (pp. 268-294). Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521694643. Retrieved 22 July 2014.
-Jeff Ogden (W163) (talk) 12:25, 22 July 2014 (UTC)
(edit conflict) Yes check.svg Done The source is not Blogspot, but the reference published by Cambridge University Press. I've added the sentence to the article. Diego (talk) 12:27, 22 July 2014 (UTC)

WWW[edit]

It is important to make the distinction between the Internet and the World Wide Web clear. At the moment, this long article does not do so. As far as I can see, it only 1) warns "not to be confused with" and much later says that the WWW (later shortened with-out explanation to "the Web" - which is not clear to every-one as being the same as the WWW) is a part of the Internet. Kdammers (talk) 05:59, 26 August 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 19 September 2014[edit]

115.249.139.203 (talk) 08:52, 19 September 2014 (UTC)

Red question icon with gradient background.svg Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format. Cannolis (talk) 09:22, 19 September 2014 (UTC)

C++ — Preceding unsigned comment added by 123.63.216.67 (talk) 04:13, 17 October 2014 (UTC)

Percentage of information carried through the internet[edit]

"It is estimated that in 1993 the Internet carried only 1% of the information flowing through two-way telecommunication, by 2000 this figure had grown to 51%, and by 2007 more than 97% of all telecommunicated information was carried over the Internet." - Where exactly in the linked source is this taken from? I cannot find this anywhere in the text :-( -- toblu [?!] 16:34, 24 October 2014 (UTC)

It does seem strange. "The information flowing through two-way telecommunication" - what does that even mean? Does it include radio, landline, satellite, mobile phone? What do we mean by "carried over the Internet"? TCP/IP? I couldn't find anything relevant in the linked document, although it did often offer comparative figures for other things for those exact years. But it is 254 pages long. --Nigelj (talk) 17:30, 24 October 2014 (UTC)