Talk:Internet activism

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Internet culture (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Internet culture, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of internet culture on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Sociology / Social Movements  (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Sociology, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Sociology on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the social movements task force.
 

February 2008[edit]

The problem you are talking about is called the digital divide, or more generally, access barriers. If you want to debate it, you should probably go to the talk page about it.

I am currently trying to edit content for style and grammar, and add sources. Because some of the content is "true but unsourced," I have been trying to add sources for unsourced statements. I changed focus of the "Growth" section and changed its title accordingly, and added the "Types" section.

I looked at the "Internet resistance" page, and due to its style and lack of sources, I am considering deleting it rather than merging it. Someone may want to add a section to Internet Activism that discusses the characteristics of the Internet as conducive to resistance, similar to the section "The Internet as a Site of Resistance."

Forcsc300 (talk) 19:45, 12 February 2008 (UTC)

There has been a battle in cyberspace over the years to clear out some of the fascist sites and to stop people from using the internet to promote race hatred.

This has been perceived and presented as an attack on freedom of speech but the contrary argument has been that members of racial minorities have a right to live their lives without fear and intimidation and using the internet to attack them is no different from using a biro and the lavatory wall - it needs to be cleaned off.

Fascist organisations have also published the names and addresses of "targets" who have subsequently had their property attacked and been subject to abuse and physical attack.

The abuse and threats have also been directed against socialists, gay people and disabled people

How one can criticize some activity just "because poor people, minorities and elderly citizens either lack access or are inexperienced in the new technologies"?

This is absolutely ridiculous. People are different.

-- Hey, I've just created a perpetual motion machine!
-- Well, we gotta have to destroy it.
-- Why?!
-- Because poor people, minorities and elderly citizens either lack access or are inexperienced in the new technologies.

Local?[edit]

"As a local example, in 1996, volunteers opposing the commercial aviation conversion of the former Marine Corps Air Station, El Toro in Orange County, CA"

So you are aware this is not exclusively an American site yes? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Iam jesse (talkcontribs) 07:42, 13 September 2007 (UTC)

Rescued text from E-Activision[edit]

Nothing looks worth saving to me, but in case anyone disagrees, here is the text from the former article E-Activism:

Stands for electronic activism, it is a form of social campaigning on the internet for causes. It involves petitioning the government and organizations about many issues and it is a vehicle for an advocacy of positive change. Charities, activists, campaigners and everyday usually a-political people use the internet to raise awareness of many important issues and to pass on email petitions for people to sign, showing their support for a cause.
E-Activism can be a powerful tool since no organizations are needed to promote any global or local cause. Any idea or concept reaches its natural dimension in relationship with the interest that it has created among internet users.
Many human rights organizations now take advantage of the internet and emailing system to spread the word about their causes. Amnesty International, Oxfam, The One Campaign, Control Arms are the major players in encouraging e-activism amongst their supporters.
Care2 on http://www.care2.com/, is a website dedicated to e-activism and invites people to create their own e-petitions or to pick from hundreds of thousands of causes to support.
Social-networking sites are catching on to this electronic activism, Myspace's E-Activism page is http://www.myspace.com/reachoutbabes.

Bongomatic (talk) 10:56, 21 September 2008 (UTC)

Wiki Blackout[edit]

This page doesn't have the sopa blackouts listed, even though they are an obvious example. I understand that the blackout was only two days ago, but would someone please add them? I will be adding a link about this to the "see also" section of the actual article.Gniob (talk) 22:34, 20 January 2012 (UTC)

The phenomenon as a whole[edit]

I've started a section on the Internet Talk page bringing up the overall phenomenon at work here. Maybe you guys or anyone could comment on it and discuss the phenomenon? - M0rphzone (talk) 06:14, 10 April 2012 (UTC)

Neurodiversity[edit]

Neurodiversity/Autism rights movement is a great example of Internet activism. Such activism most likely would never have even EXISTED if not for the Internet. Autistics generally prefer the Internet, and have utilized this medium in order to speak for themselves and stand up for their right to exist as they are without forced therapies and "cures," declaring Autism to be a difference, rather than a disorder. Being Autistic is who we are, rather than just something we *have.* I think the movement is worthy of mention within the article. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.70.193.208 (talk) 03:21, 24 August 2013 (UTC)