Talk:Internet censorship in the People's Republic of China

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Tool for checking which websites are blocked[edit]

You can use http://www.greatfirewall.biz to verify whether a certain website is currently blocked in mainland China.

Will somebody please reconcile the second sentence with the first and the third?[edit]

"Internet censorship in the People's Republic of China is conducted under a wide variety of laws and administrative regulations. There are no specific laws or regulations which the censorship follows. In accordance with these laws, more than sixty Internet regulations have been made by the People's Republic of China (PRC) government..." —Preceding unsigned comment added by 38.125.49.20 (talk) 03:59, 4 March 2011 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done. This seems to have been fixed a long time ago (not by me). --Jeff Ogden (W163) (talk) 02:42, 23 March 2013 (UTC)

Allegations against Cisco[edit]

Reuters reported this week that a lawsuit has been filed in a California federal court alleging that "Cisco and its executives designed and implemented [the Golden Shield] surveillance system for the Chinese Communist Party, knowing it would be used to root out members of the Falun Gong religion and subject them to detention, forced labor and torture." Apparently the suit further alleges that some 5,000 Falun Gong followers have been wrongfully imprisoned, tortured, or killed with the help of technology provided by Cisco. This seems quite notable, but I'm wondering where it might best belong on this page. Thoughts? Homunculus (duihua) 04:33, 25 May 2011 (UTC)

yellow tickY Partly Done. Cisco's involvement in the sale of equipment and technology to China is mentioned in the Enforcement section of this article and also in the Censorship in China section of the Cisco Systems article. But neither article mentions the lawsuit. I think the Cisco Systems article is the better place to mention this. --Jeff Ogden (W163) (talk) 03:13, 23 March 2013 (UTC)

oh, the irony[edit]

http://www.greatfirewall.biz/url/55335

well, thats not ironic really, but just funny. — Preceding unsigned comment added by DJLO (talkcontribs) 06:44, 3 June 2011 (UTC)

More background material[edit]

Now many of the sources are second-hand sources, and often not at all available on-line. It would be better to supply URLs of actual documents (even Chinese is ok) or at least credible expert sources, i.e. law firms, academic publications, or official organs instead of magazines

--Sigmundur (talk) 12:44, 7 October 2011 (UTC)

No consensus for page move[edit]

As far as I am aware, there was a consensus reached to rename the page on China to be about the PRC, rather than China as a historical or cultural entity or whatever. I am not aware of a "consensus" that says that every instance were "People's Republic of China" appears in a title it should be changed to China. Consensus is reached, as far as I know, on the pages in which things are discussed. I have not heard of a process by which consensus by a group of editors discussing one matter on one page is then automatically extended to a number of other related pages in terms of what they are to be titled. I strongly suspect this would call for individual consensus on the various pages which moves were desired for. If I am mistaken, please correct me. In any case, I suggest first beginning with a proposal, explanation, and an attempt to form consensus about the move. The Sound and the Fury (talk) 03:19, 27 February 2012 (UTC)

Packet filtering affects all protocols?[edit]

Terminate TCP packet transmissions when a certain number of controversial keywords are detected. This affects all TCP protocols...

It's obviously not true. It may only affect those protocols which contain any words, i.e. are unencrypted, uncompressed and carry any text. Even the article goes on to say that SSL and VPNs can act as a workaround, and what are they based on if not TCP/IP? Ustt (talk) 10:37, 10 November 2012 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done. That section now reads:
Terminate TCP packet transmissions when a certain number of controversial keywords are detected. This can be effective with many TCP protocols.... --Jeff Ogden (W163) (talk) 02:37, 23 March 2013 (UTC)

When will it stop?[edit]

Add a section mentioning experts opinions of when all this blocking of major websites nonsense will stop. Jidanni (talk) 09:41, 16 November 2012 (UTC)

X mark.svg Not done. I don't think the "experts" or anyone else really knows if or when the blocking of major websties will end. If anyone knows of a reliable secondary source for that information, let us know. --Jeff Ogden (W163) (talk) 02:31, 23 March 2013 (UTC)

A 2012 study of social media sites by other Harvard researchers found ...[edit]

I am about to revert a change made at 04:48, 22 March 2013 by IP 70.167.209.181 and go back to the version from 14:43, 20 March 2013 by JayJasper.

Before (version by JayJasper):

A 2012 study of social media sites by other Harvard researchers found that 13% of internet posts were blocked, focusing mainly on any form of collective action (anything from false rumors driving riots to protest organizers to large parties for fun), pornography, and criticism of the censors; significant criticisms of the government were allowed.[1]

After (version by IP 70.167.209.181):

A 2012 study of social media sites by other Harvard researchers found that 13% of internet posts were blocked, focusing mainly on any form of collective action (anything from information driving riots to protest organizers to large parties for fun), criticism of the censors, and criticism of corruption; criticisms of the government were not allowed.[2]
References
  1. ^ "China's 'Internet Police' Targets Collective Action". NPR. 8 August 2012. 
  2. ^ http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2012-10-26/opinions/35498777_1_chinese-officials-fight-corruption-bo-xilai

The after version changes the information conveyed entirely by adding the word not and changing the source of the reference to one that does not talk about the "2012 study of social media sites by other Harvard researchers". The change seems misleading to me. --Jeff Ogden (W163) (talk) 13:34, 22 March 2013 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done. Earlier this afternoon I did revert to the prior version by JayJasper. --Jeff Ogden (W163) (talk) 02:28, 23 March 2013 (UTC)

Invitation to help craft a proposal[edit]

Surveillance awareness day is a proposal for the English Wikipedia to take special steps to promote awareness of global surveillance on February 11, 2014. That date is chosen to coincide with similar actions being taken by organizations such as Mozilla, Reddit, and the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Feedback from editors of this article would be greatly appreciated. Please come join us as we brainstorm, polish, and present this proposal to the Wikipedia Community. --HectorMoffet (talk) 12:56, 18 January 2014 (UTC)