Talk:Internet media type

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Any non-W3C source for the "Internet media type" designation?[edit]

In the Wikipedia article, it says "MIME also was defined in 1992 by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)", but I read the RFC 2046 document, which is all about MIME, also linked to from this article and it is dated November 1996. What is the explanation to this? — Preceding unsigned comment added by Skcin7 (talkcontribs) 13:59, 30 June 2011 (UTC)

I've heard MIME types called "media types" a lot, and they're certainly used on the Internet, but apart from the W3C document cited in the heading, I've rarely seen them referred to by the triplet "Internet media type". In fact, "Media type" is a link to a section within the "MIME" article.

Is there a reason this article shouldn't be simply "Media type"? --Alvestrand (talk) 07:50, 31 October 2010 (UTC)

I've been working with the web and web-relate programming for years. I've never heard them called 'Internet Media Types'. Usually 'MIME types' and occasionally 'content types'. The acronym 'MIME' is often spelt 'mime' and seems to largely have lost its association with its original meaning. 81.157.195.222 (talk) 14:19, 7 March 2011 (UTC)

List[edit]

"Some of the more notable media types used on the Web are listed below"

What exactly makes these types rather than any others notable? Also vnd, x and x-pkcs are not "types", they are subtype prefixes. This list needs some cleanup. OrangeDog (τε) 10:57, 10 August 2011 (UTC)

Rationale of type, subtype?[edit]

The article needs a better explanation of the rationale by which file formats are assigned to types and subtypes. For instance, why is ogg both application/ogg and audio/ogg? Related questions: what is the rationale of placing a format under the application/ type? It seems that type application serves as a catch-all...

Similarly, the given rationale of text/ seems equally suspect. Just because a .csv, .xml, or .vcard file is written in a text format does not mean that it a human can read it. My reading of RFC 2046 Sec 3 suggests that XML, CSV and vcard never should have been placed under text/ (emphasis mine).

(1) text -- textual information. The subtype "plain" in particular indicates plain text containing no formatting commands or directives of any sort. Plain text is intended to be displayed "as-is". No special software is required to get the full meaning of the text, aside from support for the indicated character set. Other subtypes are to be used for enriched text in forms where application software may enhance the appearance of the text, but such software must not be required in order to get the general idea of the content. Possible subtypes of "text" thus include any word processor format that can be read without resorting to software that understands the format. In particular, formats that employ embeddded binary formatting information are not considered directly readable. A very simple and portable subtype, "richtext", was defined in RFC 1341, with a further revision in RFC 1896 under the name "enriched".

It would be great if anyone could help. I don't feel qualified to write such a rationale. 140.180.189.60 (talk) 21:28, 29 December 2012 (UTC)

audio/wav[edit]

The mime type audio/wav isn't listed, but is commonly used. Deprecated usage? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 12.171.92.2 (talk) 15:26, 23 December 2013 (UTC)