Talk:Irish cuisine

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WikiProject Ireland (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
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edit·history·watch·refresh Stock post message.svg To-do list for Irish cuisine:

It´s incredible that being and island and having so many fish and seafood, they don´t eat it so much or that´s my opinion taking into account the number of fishmonger´s. What is surprising it is what they do with the crabs. I have seen in the fishing port seagulls eaten the crabs body, because they take only the 2 pincers and leaf the rest.

Misconceptions[edit]

I've heard also that corned beef was eaten in Hell's Kitchen because it was cheap, and a lot of the Irish population there were short on money since they were just starting out. I don't know how accurate this is, since I've only heard it once, and I don't know what a good source for it would be-- just something for someone out there to look into. If it's true, it's ironic that the Irish are still serving corned beef briskets in their American pubs. 67.85.225.175 16:08, 5 November 2007 (UTC) Swan

Culture of Ireland content[edit]

There's a load of content on Culture of Ireland about Irish food that should be merged into here. JOHN COLLISON [ Ludraman] 21:02, 31 Oct 2004 (UTC)


Emigration during the Famine[edit]

One remark is that the figures on famine emigration are suspect or at the very least warrant qualification. A closer estimate of the number of people who emigrated is about 1m.

Having said that, the level of emigration set in train by the famine continued for decades after, though on a gradually decreasing curve. Living conditions after the Famine were in fact better than those before. But the continued emigrant flow is thought to have been as a result of the 'pull' factors, improving transport, and the thick network of emigration settlement and travel established by the enormous exodus during the famine itself. heather is sooooooo kool

Iasc - Fish[edit]

I would very much like to see a history of Fish in the Irish diet. It is mentioned briefly in the article here. What kinds of fish were eaten in Ireland during the middle ages? How were they fished? How were the cooked? Was Irish the capaplity of Irish fishermen always no better than it was on the eve of the famine? How has Fish in the Irish diet evolved since? What kinds of fish do we eat today?

Vandalism[edit]

Someone blanked out the page after a bit of vandalism. I restored it. 74.70.171.36 02:15, 17 January 2007 (UTC)


A Popular Misconception : Blight the Only Cause[edit]

The dying Irish during the famine were still farming edible crops for export or use in Ireland by the English. (In fact, as Irish died of starvation, the local officer's horses were fed with fine oats.) So, though the blight caused the potato crop to fail, it did not control the actions of the men in charge who were exporting perfectly edible food while the country's population was starving. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.114.148.238 (talk) 20:51, 5 October 2007 (UTC)

Soda, brown, or wheaten bread?[edit]

I reverted a couple of edits here and on Culture of Ireland by an editor who identified the bread next to the stout as soda bread (changing it from "wheaten bread"). After looking at the soda bread entry, I'm not so sure anymore. This might be a matter of regional naming differences. My mother, who hails from Co. Galway and is an accomplished baker, makes both soda bread and what she calls "brown bread." A bakery in my childhood neighborhood was owned by Irish immigrants (also from Connacht) who used the same names to describe the same bread. The bread next to the stout and the top two photos in the soda bread article look like their "brown bread." What I've always thought of as soda bread is yellow, with a golden brown crust, sweet (2+ cups of sugar in the mix), and features raisins and caraway seeds. Brown bread, while very versatile, is something you might use for a roast beef sandwich. Soda bread is not--it's something you'd butter and have with your tea. I'm interested in hearing the perceptions of other people familiar with the stuff. :-) Dppowell 02:07, 28 October 2007 (UTC)

Black and Tan Drink[edit]

This drink is not popular or common in Ireland - this misconception is in fact discussed on the linked Black and Tan page. Should this link be removed? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 85.134.201.88 (talk) 20:20, 10 January 2009 (UTC)

Other possible Irish foods that could be included in the article[edit]

I'm not enough of an expert to seriously contribute to this article so I though I'd put a few suggestions of things that might or might not be good candidates to be included in the list of 'Irish foods'. Someone with greater expertise might decide if they are candidates worth including.

Dropped Scones
Tayto's
Yellow Man
Guiness
Nan Barry Teabags
Fifteens
Treacle Bread
Jacob's fig rolls
Barnbrack
Fadge
Potato Bread
HB Ice cream 81.110.173.98 (talk) 10:57, 14 April 2011 (UTC)

Ulster dishes, and terms for dishes, seem to be overlooked in this article. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 93.107.74.250 (talk) 13:21, 3 December 2011 (UTC)

Your edits have not positively shown that there is a significant difference in the food of Ulster compared to the other three provinces, nor that the names are exclusive to Ulster. I think a table with regional name differences would be a good idea though.--Dmol (talk) 16:48, 3 December 2011 (UTC)

Aye, that seems like a good idea! For example, a real 'Ulster term' for fish and chips is 'fish supper', a term mainly used throughout the North and County Donegal. A very popular soft drink (or 'mineral') across the North and County Donegal is Irn-Bru, produced in the Central Belt of southern Scotland by A.G. Barr Ltd.. Perhaps all this could be added to such a list or to an expanded 'Irish cuisine' article. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 109.78.209.126 (talk) 16:08, 13 February 2012 (UTC)

Shepherds/Cottage pie.[edit]

I took out Shepherds / Cottage Pie and used the edit note that it is not traditional, or even common in Ireland. Its article does not even mention Ireland has having a version of this pie. My edit was reverted by a user who claims it is common and traditional. In my 25 years living in Ireland I never saw it once. Can anyone confirm it even exists, and if so, what locations or regions is it common. Is there any evidence of it being traditional.--Dmol (talk) 04:57, 13 May 2012 (UTC)

I've been eating Shepherd's Pie/Cottage Pie with my family and friends at home and in cafés, bars and restaurants all over Ireland for longer than the above editor has been living in Ireland. Here is just a sample of probably hundreds of references available on the web, which show that it is both common and traditional. I haven't even looked in my Irish cookbooks yet. Hohenloh + 14:52, 13 May 2012 (UTC)