Talk:Isaac Titsingh

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Dutch Batavia in the 17th Century, built in what is now North Jakarta

Would another image add to article?[edit]

This comes from the VOC article. Could this be a helpful addition to the Titsingh narrative -- to that section which describes Titsingh's return to Batavia after India and before China? The time-frame of this specific town layout may be too early ...? --Ooperhoofd 09:39, 27 September 2007 (UTC)

Father of modern japanology?[edit]

The University of Manchester's Post-colonial Research Group describes their programme in the context of graduate work in post-colonial studies.[1] One phrase is worth reiterating here:

Isaac Titsingh ... "is considered by many to be the founder of modern japanology."

The context for that phrase is to be found in the following paragraph:

The collection of Japanese books and manuscripts, assembled by the 25th Earl of Crawford in the 1860s and '70s. Many of the books derived from the collections of some of the most famous japanologists of the 19th century, and a few can be traced back to the collection of Isaac Titsingh, who lived in Japan in the 18th century and who is considered by many to be the founder of modern japanology. The archive includes works on history, biography, poetry, drama, anthropology and topography, with dictionaries, directories of samurai, encyclopedias and maps, in Japanese, Dutch and English. Among them are four volumes of annotated drawings of plants and insects.

Does this generous phrase deserve a place in the main article? If so, where? --Ooperhoofd 20:26, 10 November 2007 (UTC)

Medical mannequin[edit]

These are incomplete notes: See Johnson, William D. "Book Review: Red-Hair Medicine: Dutch-Japanese Medical Relations by Harm Beukers, A. M. Luyendijk-Elshout, M. E. van Opstall and F. Vos." Isis, Vol. 83, No. 3 (Sept., 1992), pp. 472-473.

  • Titsingh, Issac. Beschreiving van het naalde steeken en baxabranden. Paris Medical Faculty. Manuscript No. 45 (anc. No. 26). This is a translation fo a Sino-Japanese treatise containing 80 drawings which show that hte needles were inserted in the most painful area and into points elsewhere
  • Netherlands Association for Japanese Studies, No. 5. --Tenmei (talk) 01:11, 31 March 2009 (UTC)

Two questions[edit]

1) What does the M. in Isaac M. Titsingh mean?

2) Why is the alternate form Isaäc listed on the Dutch version? Is there any reliable source of him using that spelling? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.139.87.238 (talk) 21:30, 15 September 2011 (UTC)

Jewish or Indian?[edit]

Isaac is a Jewish name and Titsingh sounds like an Indian name. What was this guy? An Jewish Indian? --91.6.83.7 (talk) 18:49, 4 September 2012 (UTC)