Talk:Isaac Watts

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Untitled[edit]

Examine for unitarian beliefs. Homagetocatalonia 22:20, 17 May 2006 (UTC)

Very interesting. Thank you for that reference. It doesn't sound to me as though he was a unitarian, but just that he had some anguished self-confrontation over the doctrine of the trinity. Amity150 05:56, 19 November 2006 (UTC)

Dr. Watts' hymns[edit]

I believe that Watts wrote only the words to these hymns, not the music. Amity150 21:20, 30 May 2006 (UTC)

Other Works[edit]

I have attempted to develop the section on Watts's Logic in the 'Other Works' section, although I realise it still leaves much to be desired. Of course, it is not supposed to be final, and I welcome anyone else's contributions to it. I'll tidy it up as soon as possible. Plotinus 19:04, 14 July 2007 (UTC)






/////////// i have the psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs, of the rev. isaac watts, d.d. to which are added select hymns, from other authors; and directions for musical expression by samuel worcester, d.d.

published 1859

falling apart but a fantastic book! —Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.69.100.210 (talk) 16:10, 1 May 2008 (UTC)

Sounds which address the ear are lost …[edit]

Watts translated Horace like this: "Sounds which address the ear are lost and die / In one short hour; but that which strikes the eye / Lives long upon the mind; the faithful sight / Engraves the knowledge with a beam of light.", in "The improvement of the mind: to which is added, a discourse on the education of children and youth" by Watts, 1815. The Latin original comes from Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus), Ars poetica, Satires, line 180, see http://www.latim.ufsc.br/Ars%20poetica.html or http://www.jstor.org/pss/262907. The original: "Segnius irritant animos demissa per aurem, / Quam quae sunt oculis subjecta fidelibus, et quae / Ipse sibi tradit spectator.". Watts is frequently quoted; I found the quote in "The Elements of Euclid" by Oliver Bryne on the introduction page xii. Perhaps this famous quotation on the influence of pictures vs. mere sounds might be added to Watts. — Fritz Jörn (talk) 19:48, 13 June 2011 (UTC)