Talk:Israeli support for Iran during the Iran–Iraq war

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I've added another source. Are there still complaints about context and POV? --Ebudswenson (talk) 22:02, 29 May 2008 (UTC)

Seems like this was drive-by tagging. i don't see context and POV issues anymore, and if we add one or two more sources, we can safely remove the remaining tag. MiS-Saath (talk) 06:01, 28 August 2008 (UTC)


Tags and edits[edit]

Edits claiming sources are suggesting a "conspiracy theory" have been added to the article. The edit summary claims, "this article is based on highly dubious sources. in fact it shouldn't exist at all"

What evidence is there that Trita Parsi and John Bulloch are the slightest bit dubious, let alone "highly dubious"? --BoogaLouie (talk) 01:03, 5 December 2008 (UTC)
The book by Iranian author Trita Parsi is a dubious source as it contains some very strong allegations not supported by any evidence whatsoever. I'm not saying her allegations shouldn't be mentioned at all, but they should be clearly presented as Trita Parsi's personal convictions, not as real facts.Keverich1 (talk) 21:59, 24 December 2008 (UTC)
The book is scholarly and reputable. Again I ask you, What evidence is there that Trita Parsi and John Bulloch are the slightest bit dubious, let alone "highly dubious"? --BoogaLouie (talk) 15:55, 26 December 2008 (UTC)

Does anyone still have a reason to tag the article? otherwise I'm going to remove the tags. --BoogaLouie (talk) 21:50, 3 April 2009 (UTC)

tag gone. --BoogaLouie (talk) 18:49, 11 April 2009 (UTC)

Uncertainties in the total story[edit]

Lack of firm evidence and citing anonymous military and professional show about the nature of these reports at the time of major Iranian operations and of course great defeat of Saddam and Drrastay justify such failures were reported to witness the existence of ambiguities and the fundamental principle Of course, rumors that most of the Arabic and Western sources - Arabic for support of Arab public opinion against the Persians as were. Perhaps after a mass of Israeli arms sales to Iran in the Iran-Iraq war, was sentenced to indicate that the lack of accompanying Israeli government is in such transactions. It is worth noting that all these issues as was the Islamic Republic of Iran Israel always to be considered as their enemy. Always objective evidence against claims that it never has been found and documents exist primarily with plenty of question marks is associated with. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Rostame dastane iran (talkcontribs) 01:47, 27 July 2010 (UTC)

redundant paragraph -- needs fixing[edit]

On 7 June 1981, a squadron of Israeli Air Force F-16A fighter aircraft, with an escort of F-15As, bombed and heavily damaged the Osirak nuclear reactor in Iraq. According to journalist Nicholas Kristof, had it not been for the attack, "Iraq would have gained nuclear weapons in the 1980s, it might now have a province called Kuwait and a chunk of Iran, and the region might have suffered nuclear devastation."[8] The reactor was part of Iraq's weapon program as had been reported on September 8, 1975, then-Vice President Saddam Hussein declared publicly that the acquisition of the French reactors was the first actual step in the production of an Arab atomic weapon. Iranian Revolution accelerated Saddam's interest in atomic bombs and he ordered his scientists directly, in December 1979, to build them. It has been said that if Osirak had not been destroyed, Iraq would have had become a nuclear state and Saddam would taken over a large chunk of Iranian territory as well as Kuwait. [

Two sentences with almost the same words in them; does the same idea need to be mentioned twice in almost the same textual fashion? 1) According to journalist Nicholas Kristof, had it not been for the attack, "Iraq would have gained nuclear weapons in the 1980s, it might now have a province called Kuwait and a chunk of Iran.. 2) It has been said that if Osirak had not been destroyed, Iraq would have had become a nuclear state and Saddam would taken over a large chunk of Iranian territory as well as Kuwait. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.84.68.252 (talk) 23:10, 30 June 2012 (UTC)