Talk:Italian Riviera

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Gianfranco, isn't the coast over the French- smells of poo Italian border (so westwards from Genoa) also called Riviera? I don't know if the name is just for the entire area or if there are a French Riviera and an Italian Riviera. Jeronimo 05:36 Aug 1, 2002 (PDT)

Effectively I know the french coast as French Riviera (quite rare, indeed), or more often as Côte d'Azur. I happened to hear some time ago my english friends simply calling Riviera the italian coasts only, so (hoping that I am correctly remembering) I thought it was the principal use.
In italian, really, the term Riviera includes the Riviera di Levante, from Genoa toward Tuscany, and Riviera di Ponente, from Geona to France. It should "formally" end at Ventimiglia (customs with France).
Since I had used the word Riviera in Italo Calvino a minute before, I just quickly wrote something here to identify the area, but if I was too... "nationalistic", we could perhaps turn it into a disambiguating page, depending on the english use. :-)
I profite for asking if "riviera" is used in english too to define also an obstacle (sort of small water pool) in horse jumping competitions; if so I'd add it to the article. G

Just looked it up in Webster's dictionary, and it appears that Riviera (sometimes also written as riviera) is indeed the area in France and Italy. Also, "Côte d'Azur" is given as the French part of the Riviera.

On Google, English language websites give 80,000 hits for "French Riviera" and 70,000 for "Côte d'Azur". Jeronimo


I'm french, here we never use the word "riviera", but only "cote d'azur". In Italian, people said "costa azurra".

There's also a Mexican Riviera. and as of late it's become fashionable to attach the term "Riviera" to just about any scenic strand of coastland, particularly semitropical or tropical, and usually with an eye to tourism. That gives us the Mayan Riviera, British Riviera (although that's nowhere near tropical), and California Riviera. I wouldn't be surprised to find Hawaii, China, and Japan with rivierae...204.52.215.107 06:19, 11 Dec 2004 (UTC)

Disanb page[edit]

In splitting these pages and creating the disambiguation page, Riviera, I used the description here by user User:204.52.215.107, with thanks. Ted Wilkes 13:32, 20 May 2005 (UTC)

My goodness there are a lot of them—good work! I have provided a link to that page here under See also, replacing the previous specific link to the Turkish Riviera. (I left the specific link to French Riviera in, however, since it’s contiguous with the Italian one and immediately relevant to this article.) —Ian Spackman 12:19, 24 September 2006 (UTC)

Extent of the Riviera[edit]

I am about to save a modified version of this article which I made because I got lost in the existing definitions, and thought other readers might too! There are a couple of articles in the Italian Wikipedia which are quite clear that ‘The Riviera’ runs from Monaco to Capo Corvo. (Capo Corvo seems now to be known as Punta Bianca: the eastern boundary of the Gulf of La Spezia.) Looking at a map that seems to be a plausible definition. Currently we sort of imply that the riviera extends into Tuscany. But the coastal strip there seems to be different: crucially the Appennines have moved inland. So I have accepted the Italian Wikipedia definition of the southern/eastern bound. At the western end I don’t find Monaco completely compelling in a physical geography sense: you have to get closer to Nice before the mountains really move away from the sea. But since our article is about the ‘Italian Riviera’ rather than ‘The Riviera’ I stopped worrying and placed the western limit at the France-Italy political border. —Ian Spackman 12:19, 24 September 2006 (UTC)

Fawlty link[edit]

The link for "San Rocco" leads to the saint, not the city. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 83.250.57.62 (talk) 23:51, 15 February 2011 (UTC)