Talk:Iva Toguri D'Aquino

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Untitled[edit]

Thanks Zoe. Great edits.

-Reboot

Something is Whitewashed Here[edit]

My father was veteran of Iwo Jima. He remembered her listing American ships that the Japanese had sunk .. including at least one he could see in perfect condition at the time of hearing the shortwave broadcast. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 130.76.96.22 (talk) 19:59, 16 April 2010 (UTC)

Opinionated First Paragraph[edit]

This following paragraph is inappropriate for the tone of Wikipedia:

If the U.S. Army released her for lack of evidence, where did the Federal Government get the evidence for eight counts of treason? The correct explanation (which came from her original arresting officer), was that the U.S. Army released her after the war - not due to lack of evidence, but specifically because her detainment no longer served a purpose. The United States Army Intelligence Corp. ruled she was forced by the Japanese government to perform her broadcast during the war and post war was no longer deemed a threat to the security of our nation. It was only upon her return to the United States that strong anti-Japanese sentiments led the Federal government to prosecute her to meet their own political agendas.

The tone of this paragraph is far too opinionated for a encyclopedia. Conspiracy theories and anti-government statements have no place on Wikipedia. Any thoughts? mrscientistman (talk) 22:14, 22 August 2009 (UTC)mrscientistman

$10,000 or $100,000?[edit]

After getting an email on the foundation mail questioning this amount, I've had a look around to see what the correct figure is. Most sources seem to say that the fine was $10,000 (ignoring all the mirror hits). I've changed the figure in the article, but if others could check that would be helpful. -- sannse (talk) 20:03, 28 August 2005 (UTC)


Encyclopedic?[edit]

"In 2003, Toguri was an 87 year-old shopkeeper residing in Chicago, Illinois. The Toguri J Mercantile Company, which specializes in Japanese imports, can be found at 851 West Belmont; right off the Belmont Red Line stop, near the corner of Clark and Belmont. Mrs. Toguri can still be seen working there."

This makes me uneasy; do we really need this information to be this specific on encyclopedic grounds? — Matt Crypto 12:11, 19 January 2006 (UTC)

You have a point there, but the fact she can be seen working in the family store has been published in several Chicago newspapers. I would draw the line at giving directions, but it's not exactly a secret either. --Dforest 00:45, 6 March 2006 (UTC)
Even so, putting the information in Wikipedia will bring it right to the top of a Google search and make it more easily accessible to a wider range of people; this would seem to go against WP:BLP#Presumption in favor of privacy. --Jpbrenna 08:55, 27 September 2006 (UTC)
It's a company that does business with the public, thus there is no presumption of privacy, but there is no need to give the address in the article (it is easily found). I visited there yesterday, talked with her nephew. Nothing displayed in the store makes reference to Iva, but they aren't reluctant to talk about her. The most noteworthy thing about the store is that it is not located in a "Japanese" (or even Asian) neighborhood. It is the only Japanese import store in the city of Chicago, and during my hour-long visit, none of the customers were Asian. Critic-at-Arms 00:12, 20 August 2007 (UTC)

Snip[edit]

I snipped this:

Please note that the discussion above omits both the confessions made by the defendant while held by US Forces in Japan, and more seriously the admissions made by her in her appeal of her conviction to the Ninth US Circuit. The most serous court admission is that she knew some of her material would harm the US, but she thought the material would be withheld until Japan's forces were in a better position. The case is only accessible on Lexis or Westlaw.

on the grounds that it ought to be discussed here, then if it pans out worked into the article with references rather than a bizzare "please note the above...". I'm not opposed to including it of course (it seems relevant) but it ought to be substantiated and put in the article rather (inlcuding a link to it from lexis or westlaw rather than an allusian to them)... Reboot 14:29, 12 February 2006 (UTC)

Factual error[edit]

"After the war, she was arrested on September 5, 1945 in Yokohama and was tried for treason after attempting to re-enter the United States in 1948"

Is this what the Americans refer to as pre-emptive strike? Mackan 05:51, 28 March 2006 (UTC)


Wronglfuly convicted[edit]

"Iva Toguri D'Aquino (born 4 July 1916) is frequently but erroneously identified as one of the World War II propaganda-radio hostesses dubbed Tokyo Rose by Allied soldiers. "

Is she really erroneously identified - didn't she make some broadcasts (even thought she really didn't have a choice) - Matthew238 02:44, 23 August 2006 (UTC)

Only person pardoned of treason[edit]

"becoming the only US citizen convicted of treason to later be pardoned", this is not true. Tomoya Kawakita was pardoned by President Kennedy, arcording to her article Kawakita v. United States.Depkmaster 19:36, 11 October 2006 (UTC)

I looked around some more info about Kawakita and apparently he was released and deported, but not pardoned, if one can believe the Los Angeles Times. I have changed the article there and added a citation. - BanyanTree 13:33, 1 November 2006 (UTC)

The best information, and "citations" for those editors who want more, is in the judgments of the D'Aquino and Kawakita cases themselves: http://uniset.ca/other/cs5/192F2d338.html http://www.uniset.ca/other/cs5/271P2d18.html ("theft" of Kawakita family assets while they were interned, apparently not an uncommon event) http://uniset.ca/other/cs5/190F2d506.html Kawakita appeal (with links to earlier and later proceedings). As the cited judgment notes in an editorial addition linked to contemporary news reports, "Kawakita was pardoned on Oct. 24, 1963 under condition of perpetual exile, having lost his American nationality by reason of conviction for treason."

I don't edit Wikipedia entries; the preceding is provided for whoever cares to use it. Andygx (talk) 06:18, 24 November 2009 (UTC)

Charged by the FBI for Treason[edit]

The Federal Bureau of Investigation, like any other federal law enforcement agency (DEA, ATF, U.S. Postal Inspection Service, etc.) does not "charge" or indict anyone. Charges and indictments are prepared, drafted and prosecuted by the United States Attorney's Office. The FBI may have INVESTIGATED the case but they by no means indicted her. It may sound like a trivial distinction but to say the FBI charged her sounds really ignorant to anyone who has even a slight knowledge of the federal criminal system. As such, I believe an edit is in order. 202.128.1.120 07:17, 19 April 2007 (UTC)

Actually, investigating or arresting someone on charge of treason equals charging them with treason. If the arrest is made by direction (verbal or written warrant, as opposed to arrest during offense such as catching a burglar) the arresting agency is acting under the authority of the attorney who obtained the warrant, indictment, etc. Thus, it's clunky but accurate either way. Critic-at-Arms 00:20, 20 August 2007 (UTC)
Oh, BTW, it's not "charged for treason," it's "charged WITH treason." Gotcha! Critic-at-Arms 00:21, 20 August 2007 (UTC)

POW camp[edit]

"Toguri had previously risked her life smuggling food into the nearby Prisoner of War (POW) camp where Cousens and Ince were held, gaining the inmates' trust."

I don't think she herself was ever at the camp. I think she gave food which others brought back to the camp. 220.99.61.206 (talk) 06:08, 26 February 2008 (UTC)

Number of english broadcasters[edit]

On this article it says there were approximately a dozen english broadcasters of the propaganda.Otherwise the Tokyo Rose article states that there is about twenty.I imagine that it has to be just one or the other for both articles' number.The website The Straight Dope says a dozen so thats what I'm going to use for the number.Feel free to change it if it's found to be incorrect. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Workster (talkcontribs) 19:59, 3 June 2008 (UTC)

ACLU support of Japanese Internment in error[edit]

The ACLU fought AGAINST the internment. They also did not support other FDR policies as stated. "The ACLU was also the only national organization to challenge Japanese American internment camps during World War II..." e.g., [1] —Preceding unsigned comment added by Sbattles (talkcontribs) 21:38, 14 July 2008 (UTC)

Sorry, not true -- you're seeing a little revisionism there. In fact, the National Committee of the ACLU issued a resolution in support of FDR and Order 9066 (now, if forced to admit having done so, they claim that it was "weak," though it was passed in a nearly unanimous vote).
Not to get involved in the argument (I'm sure the ACLU has been on the wrong side of history before). But I don't think revisionism means what you think it means. 76.169.33.129 (talk) 09:33, 9 February 2010 (UTC)
The ACLU Northern California Chapter defied "orders from above" as members Ernst Besig and Wayne M Collins who fought for the rights of the internees. The schism between the National Committee and Northern California chapter lasted at least until the 1980s (when those involved were dead, and a lot of their proteges were retired).


That information is in the records, but you have to dig a little to find it (as I have done). I've also spoken with people who worked with Collins (which is how I found the records in the first place). Critic-at-Arms (talk) 23:18, 27 July 2008 (UTC)

The claims of "a little revisionism" and "orders from above" are nebulous. See Korematsu v. United States (1944), where ACLU filed briefs in amicus curiae on behalf of the Japanese-American Citizen's League, inter alia... Also see Fighting the Japanese Internment in Federal Court: The A.C.L.U. During World War II Blair 2000; also In Opposition to the Japanese Internment: The A.C.L.U. During World War II. Blair, 1999a. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Sbattles (talkcontribs) 15:04, 31 August 2008 (UTC)

If you read contemporary ACLU releases, you will find unabashed support for FDR's issuance of EO 9066 at the national level. ACLU co-founder Norman Thomas issued scathing letters and articles taking the ACLU national committee to the woodshed for this, and noting that even the Northern California committee was divided on the issue, "but at least are not members of the lynchmob."
The NorCal and National committees had a very tenuous relationship for decades because of this difference of opinion. If you rely on the ACLU autohistories, you would never know this, but that doesn't change the facts or make the papers vanish. Critic-at-Arms (talk) 03:59, 11 December 2008 (UTC)

Inappropriate external links[edit]

I moved the following links from the External links section. They may be useful sources for the article content but are inappropriate for the EL section:

Jojalozzo (talk) 20:06, 25 January 2015 (UTC)