Talk:Ivan Bunin

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I'm moving this piece of original research by anon from the text here:

"A public opinion survey was conducted by the Russian state agency VTsIOM and published in late 1999. It asked several thousand Russians to name the most important Russian writers of the 20th Century. Respondents were allowed to name as many choices as they liked but not a single person named Bunin, clearly showing how effective Soviet propaganda was in destroying the reputation of its opponents within Russia." --Ghirlandajo 08:19, 12 December 2005 (UTC)

"On the journey through Germany to accept the prize in Stockholm, he was detained by the Nazis, ostensibly for jewel smuggling, and forced to drink a bottle of castor oil."

How can that be in 1933?

--- The Nazis came to power in 1933.

What sense does it make to smuggle jewels from France to Sweden, from a country where he lived to a country which he visited for just a few days?

--- Not even any Nazi would suppose those stupid things. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 77.185.231.206 (talk) 16:39, 8 March 2010 (UTC)



What is an "apical" work of Russian literature? Does this mean "epic"? Or perhaps "epoch making"? Fixlein (talk) 21:06, 10 September 2008 (UTC)

According to Merriam-Webster, "apical" means "of, relating to, or situated at an apex", where "apex" means "the highest or culminating point". More colloquially, you might say the work is a "highlight" of Russian literature. --Leonard Vertighel (talk) 20:55, 6 October 2008 (UTC)

Castor oil nonsense[edit]

...has to be removed. On the journey through Germany to accept the prize in Stockholm, he was detained by the Gestapo on suspicion of jewel smuggling and forced to drink a bottle of castor oil. - Russian SilverAge site has got it all wrong, apparently. 1) 1933 Nobel Prize ceremony was unmarred by any scandal of the sort: Bunin was greeted everywhere, Germany included (mind you, Gestapo was formed a year later, in 1934). 2) There was indeed an incident in 1936, on the German-Swiss border, in Lindau, where Bunin was stripped half-naked and searched (mentioned, say, here). Bunin responded by publishing a detailed account of the whole affair in a French newspaper, the Germans reacted with a statement, saying that was more or less a standard procedure. <full texts can be found in the 1965's Complete Bunin, Vol. IX>. Officially, foreign currency smuggling suspicion was an issue, while Bunin insisted it was books he'd had with him that caused the problem (with words 'Bolshevist propaganda' mentioned once or twice). Not a single reference neither to jewels, nor to a castor oil had been made by any of the sides involved. The incident was a minor one, in Bunin's diary it hasn't even got a mention. Looks like in 1936 he was very angry indeed, although not with the Germans, but rather with things that were going round him in France. -- Evermore2 (talk) 12:24, 25 May 2011 (UTC)