Talk:Jacob Burckhardt

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german wikipedia[edit]

I think, it could to be a little bit more comprehensive. Look into German Wikipedia User:Mario todte, 17:55, 12th of May 2005 (CEST)

Anon addition[edit]

Anon added this, Ive removed it from the article:

Central to Burckhardt's ideas was a reaction to Hegel's philosophy of history, which understood all history as an exposition of "spirit." Burckhardt can be understood as a conservative reaction to Hegel's theory of history. See: "Jacob Burckhardt: History as Education and Culture" http://www.janus.umd.edu/May2001/Melson/01.html

This needs to be expanded on (better explained) and integrated into the article by someone who knows more about it. --Stbalbach 18:15, 3 February 2006 (UTC)

reflections on history[edit]

There also is a collection of essay's and lectures he did on the theories of teaching/writing history called "Reflections on History" that is still widely read and studied by students of History. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 207.145.132.222 (talkcontribs) .

Reception[edit]

The article ought to mention that Burckhardt's conception of the Renaissance as a revival of pagan philosophy and individualism after an age of asceticism and ignorance was bitterly contested by Medieval historians and historians of science such as Lynn Thorndike and is not accepted any more, or accepted only with severe qualifications. In 1927 Charles Homer Haskins wrote a very famous book, The Renaissance of the Twelfth Century, showing that the period we know as the Renaissance was preceded by many revivals of classical antiquity that took place periodically in the Middle Ages, most notably in France in the twelfth century, which had virtually of all the characteristics of the later one:

The continuity of history rejects violent contrasts between successive periods, and modern research shows the Middle Ages less dark and less static, the Renaissance less bright and less sudden, than was once supposed. The Italian Renaissance was preceded by similar, if less wide-reaching, movements.

The book to read is Wallace K. Ferguson, The Renaissance in Historical Thought: Five Centuries of Interpretation (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1948). Then in 1960 the great art historian Erwin Panofsky wrote Renaissance and Renascences in Western Art: "The lectures posed the (now) generally accepted notion that smaller "renaissances" (re-births) of the classical happened periodically in medieval art and literature before the major one in Italy."[1]173.52.245.208 (talk) 03:30, 21 August 2009 (UTC) —Preceding unsigned comment added by 173.52.245.208 (talk) 03:24, 21 August 2009 (UTC)