Talk:Jan Želivský

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Untitled[edit]

Automatic translation of text (by google language tools) from [the German WP article] (Obviously needs correcting for grammar/wording before being added):

Jan Želivský[edit]

Jan Želivský (* 1380 (?) in Humpolec (?); † 9. March 1422 in Prague) was a radical priest of the Hussiten, and apart from January Žižka and January Hus of one the schillerndsten personality of the movement.

From the time of 1418 that he was a medal man, afterwards priest of the Prämonstratenserklosters is only well-known in the südböhmischen Želiv (dt. Seelau) and after 1416 to the Pfarrei in Jiříce. Since 1418 it preached in the Prager new city in the church of the holy Stephan and starting from 1419 in the church of the unbefleckten virgin Maria. Its radical-social lectures arrived good with the people and it were promoted with the time to the people leader.

30. July 1419 he stated a gathering of people, which stormed the city hall in Prager new city and ended with the first Prager Fenstersturz (Defenestration). Due to the events it came to the radicalization of many Prager citizens, who as the beginning of the Hussitenkriege is regarded. It was selected to one of the four main people and later to the councilman of the insurgent ones.

Since 1420 it began to tear power, actually promoted from its large popularity with the people. It used this again won power for the destruction of its opponents. With the course of the Prager and Taboriten to East Bohemia he already befehligte the army, so also with the course after Brüx (Czech: Most). With the Synode on 4 July 1420 it finally received the absolute power in Prague, which called however many envious people on the plan and caused also distrust. Gradually the opposition grew against it. At the beginning of of February 1421 stepped a commission into the life, which already entmachtete it on 5 February 1421 and left to it only few competencies. 1423 became on he instruction of Jakob von Mies (techechisch: Jakoubek CPU Stříbra) because of the acts of violence during its regency arrests and to 9. March 1422 executed. Its successor became Jakub Vlk.

Biographie[edit]

Božena Auštecká.: Jan Želivský jako politik, Prag 1925


--Michael Noel Jones 13:56, 27 July 2006 (UTC)


Biography (revised, rough translation)[edit]

Jan Želivský (Born 1380 (?) in Humpolec (?); Died 9th March 1422 in Prague) was a radical Hussite priest, and was one of the leading personalities of the Hussite movement alongside Jan Žižka and Jan Hus.

Since 1418 he was a ??medal man??, and later became a priest of the Prämonstratenserklosters, but is only well-known in the Southern Bohemian (=südböhmischen?) Želiv (dt. Seelau) and after 1416 to the Pfarrei in Jiříce. Since 1418 he preached in Prague at the church of St. Stephen and from 1419 in the church of the Virgin Mary. His radical-social lectures were agreed upon by the people and led to Zelivsky becoming a leader of the people.

On 30 July, 1419 he led his congregation to the city hall in Prague, demanding the release of Hussite prisoners; this ended with the First Defenestration of Prague. Due to the events it came to the radicalization of many Prague citizens, the First Defenestration of Prague is regarded as the beginning of the Hussite Wars. Želivský was selected as one of the four main leaders of the Hussites and later as councilman(?) of the insurgent(?) Hussites.

From 1420 the Hussite movement began to gain power, and became very popular with the people. The movement used this to destroy its opponents. With the course of the Prague and Taborites to East Bohemia he already had some command of the army, so also with the course after Brüx. With the synod on 4 July, 1420 he finally received absolute power in Prague, this however led to many envious people and caused distrust. Gradually opposition grew against him. At the beginning of February 1421 stepped a commission into the life, which already (??entmachtete??) it on 5 February, 1421 and left to it only few competencies. In 1422, on the instruction of Jacob von Mies, Jan Zelivsky was arrested and on 9 March 1422 he was executed. Želivský's successor was Jacob Vlk.

Rshu 16:39, 27 July 2006 (UTC)

Ammended --Michael Noel Jones 18:24, 27 July 2006 (UTC)