Talk:Jayne's Hill

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Accuracy of elevation data[edit]

  • This is an amusing little quandary. According to the USGS GNIS system, "High Hill" only has an elevation of 387 feet,[1] though I am familiar with the claims recited in the article that it is 401 (or 400.9) feet (which I fleshed out with references). Is the GNIS system not accurate? Here is someone's elses musings from April 2001 also seriously questioning the 400 foot claim, with their own measurement information included. Suffolk County's West Hills County Park page says 400 feet. A Newsday article[2] dated Oct 18, 1986 states 400.9 feet. The USGS map excerpt (from 1979, but is based on earlier data) I added to this page today shows a 380 feet contour line, and no 400 line at the summit, so that only shows its between 380-399 feet. The 1999 Long Island Botanical Society Newsletter article I cited says 400.9 feet -- that article includes a map which lists a summit of 420 feet, with a notation added for 1998 elevation at 400.9 feet. Apparently that map dates from 1931, and it appears to track a 1903 USGS topo map that showed a 400 and 420 foot contour line. So, there's certainly reliable sources to keep the 400.9 foot claim in the article for now, though its not free of dispute apparently.--Neighborhoodpalmreader (talk) 17:46, 21 September 2009 (UTC)