Talk:Jimi Hendrix

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Ancestry - clarification needed[edit]

Something doesn’t jive here. Ohio became a state in 1803, and has always been a free state. (For those of you not from the US, “free state” means slavery was illegal in that state.) Therefore, the grain merchant from Urbana, Ohio who fathered Bertran Philander Ross Hendrix was unlikely to have been a slave owner, unless he lived in a different state. Also, if Bertran was born in 1866, that means that slavery was most likely to have been outlawed everywhere in the US (at least legally) by the time he was conceived, and certainly by the time he was born. The Civil War officially ended on June 22, 1865, and the Emancipation Proclamation was enforced throughout all remaining regions of the South yet to free their slaves. Slavery did continue for a couple months longer in 1865 in some isolated areas in the South, but overall, this section may be inaccurate. Tidewater 2014 (talk) 18:47, 7 January 2015 (UTC)

Yes, the reference doesn't use or imply "slave" and "overseer". It states, "How their path's cross is unknown. The most likely explanation is that Fanny was in Mr. Ross's employment when she was raped or seduced." (Shapiro p. 7). Another reference shows Fanny Whitefield born around 1826 in Ohio and there is no mention that she was a slave (Brown p. 6). Ross is identified as being from Urbana, Ohio, and Urbana, Illinois, (both in counties named Champaign) and there is no mention of him as a slave owner (Brown pp. 6–7). However, in Room Full of Mirrors, Cross identifies Fanny as a former slave and that Ross once owned her (Cross p. 16). Cross' book has many unique conclusions and lists only persons interviewed by chapter as support. Propose to re-word as: "Hendrix's paternal grandfather, Bertran Philander Ross Hendrix (born 1866), was the result of an extramarital affair between a black woman, also named Fanny, and a grain merchant from Urbana, Ohio or Illinois, and one of the wealthiest white men in the area at that time. (Shapiro & Glebbeek 1990, p. 7; Brown 1992, pp. 6–7)" And add as a Note: "Author Charles R. Cross in Room Full of Mirrors writes "He [Hendrix's paternal grandfather, Bertran Philander Ross Hendrix] was born out of wedlock, and from the biracial coupling of his mother, a former slave, and a white merchant who had once owned her. (Cross 2005, p. 16)." —Ojorojo (talk) 17:25, 9 January 2015 (UTC)

Sorry for the slow reply Ojorojo, but thanks for looking into this. I agree with the changes. Until more detailed information is published, this is about as good as could be expected. Tidewater 2014 (talk) 15:51, 20 January 2015 (UTC)

FW little OT IW, slavery actually lasted somewhat longer in the "North" than in the South; the Emancipation Proclamation didn't apply to the Union slave states of Missouri, Kentucky, West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia, and slavery only ended there with the ratification of the 13th Amendment in 1866. Solicitr (talk) 16:58, 21 January 2015 (UTC)

According to the wiki article on the 13th, the ratification was on December 6th, 1865, many of those states (including Missouri and Maryland) did ratify it earlier - though I guess in this case all we care about are Illinois and Ohio - the former, being Lincoln's home state, was the first to ratify the 13th. Ohio was always a free state, and Illinois was as well, though there was some slavery taking place there illegally in the 1820's. This was of course quite a bit before 1866. Tidewater 2014 (talk) 18:35, 23 January 2015 (UTC)

RfC: Adding acid rock as a genre in the article's infobox[edit]

Should the infobox include acid rock in its genre parameter? Dan56 (talk) 06:48, 18 December 2014 (UTC)

Sources

Proving this to be a non-controversial addition, numerous sources say acid rock is a style Jimi Hendrix played or was known for, some of which are:

  • Writer Frank N. Magill: "Rock music was changed when the heavy psychedelic blues and guitar virtuousity of Jimi Hendrix became a huge success, creating 'acid rock' and pointing the way to fusion and heavy metal." ([1])
  • the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, which is used in this article as a source, says "acid rock" was an influence along with blues and jazz ([2])
  • history professors Timothy P. Maga in this reference book on the 1960s and Neil A. Hamilton in his reference book on the 1970s both characterized Hendrix's unique sound as acid rock ([3], [4])
  • music professor James E. Perone ([5])
  • contemporary sources in Ebony and Jet magazine ([6], [7])
  • music critic Clinton Heylin, who called Hendrix one of the "uncrowned kings of acid rock" ([8])
  • According to writer and musician Michael Campbell, Hendrix was associated with acid rock ([9]).
  • HP Newquist wrote , "[Hendrix's] acid rock was appropriately frenetic" ([10]).

There are many more sources that do the same, but to verify it for the purposes of this article, I would suggest adding to this article's Legacy section some version of: American writer [[Frank N. Magill]] credited Hendrix with creating [[acid rock]] and pioneering the [[heavy metal music|heavy metal]] and [[jazz fusion|fusion]] styles of rock music.{{sfn|Magill|1998|p=1478}}, which is from this source: Magill, Frank N. (1998). Chronology of Twentieth-Century History: Arts and Culture. Fitzroy Dearborn. ISBN 1884964664. 

Votes
  • Support as the editor proposing this change. Dan56 (talk) 06:48, 18 December 2014 (UTC)
  • Oppose. None of the sources discuss what specifically in Hendrix's musical style, playing, or songs is "acid rock". They only mention acid rock in passing and several of the sources are misrepresented. The R&R Hall of Fame lists acid rock among several influences: "Free jazz, Delta blues, acid rock, hardcore funk and the songwriting of Bob Dylan and the Beatles all figured as influences". Listing a musician's influences is not the same as characterizing him; no one suggests that Hendrix is a free jazz or Delta blues musician. Likewise, Newquist is addressing his guitar techniques; the sentence reads "His acid rock was appropriately frenetic; his ballad playing melodic and gentle". Again, a single element of style doesn't define the musician; no one calls him a balladeer. Campbell's discussion points to the musician's roots as more important to his identity than the drug "overlay": "both Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton, who were also associated with acid rock, had deep blues roots" (genres for the Eric Clapton article don't include acid rock). A quick look at WP Hendrix song articles (Category:Songs written by Jimi Hendrix) lists only "Fire" as "acid rock" (along with "Blues rock, hard rock, psychedelic rock"). If acid rock describes his music, then this would also be reflected in his songs. —Ojorojo (talk) 15:41, 20 December 2014 (UTC)
  • Oppose. The article body can talk about how observers have placed Hendrix relative to "acid rock" but I don't think it is appropriate to elevate the connection to the infobox genre parameter. Frank N. Magill's expertise was general; he was not a musicologist, and I don't think he is particularly authoritative here. Nobody who is an expert on acid rock says that Hendrix created it, or was a primary example of it. Binksternet (talk) 20:22, 27 December 2014 (UTC)
  • Oppose I agree with Binksternet and Ojorojo that "acid rock" developed in San Francisco in the year before Hendrix started recording as a rock star. I am against loading up musician articles with excessive genres. Cullen328 Let's discuss it 23:02, 27 December 2014 (UTC)
  • Support - I saw Hendrix live in the 60's. Of course he played acid rock. Who cares if he invented it or not? Tunes like 'Are You Experienced' and 'Purple Haze' are about taking acid. Assertions to the contrary are ludicrous, and absurdly pedantic, no matter what anyone says or writes. Put it in the info box that it was a genre he played, or be wrong. Jusdafax 02:44, 3 January 2015 (UTC)
  • Support - per numerous sources, and no rational counter argument. Dlabtot (talk) 15:22, 14 January 2015 (UTC)
Discussion/comments
  • Hendrix was not responsible for "creating 'acid rock'". This is an error on Magill's part and is unsupported. Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead, two groups that are usually identified as acid rock, were well established before Hendrix went to England to begin his rock recording career. Campbell writes "The band that first directed the spotlight to the San Francisco sound and to acid rock was Jefferson Airplane". (p. 213, emphasis added). They released two albums Jefferson Airplane Takes Off (August 1966) and Surrealistic Pillow (February 1967), before Hendrix's first album Are You Experienced (May 1967 UK, August 1967 US). The Grateful Dead debut album (March 1967) also preceded the Experience album. Tom Wolfe, author of The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, wrote "Through the Dead's experience with the Pranksters [at acid tests] was borne the sound known as 'acid rock'". Hendrix biographers do not mention that he performed at or attended these events prior to his return to the US in June 1967 for the Monterey Pop Festival. —Ojorojo (talk) 15:13, 27 December 2014 (UTC)
  • Comment - I'd support per the number of reliable sources on it but there are already 4 genres in the infobox. The information should be in prose, written from a neutral point of view of course, and not given undue weight (if, as suggested above, it is a somewhat of a minority view or not contextualized enough, relative to other style/genre info in the article). Agree with Fitzroy Dearborn. --Lapadite (talk) 00:47, 5 January 2015 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 11 January 2015[edit]

Jimi Hendrix Was born in Vancouver, BC, Canada but raised in Seattle, WA. Camquatch (talk) 19:31, 11 January 2015 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: please provide reliable sources that support the change you want to be made. Cannolis (talk) 19:36, 11 January 2015 (UTC)

Electric Lady: First?[edit]

"Electric Lady was the first artist owned and operated recording studio." I don't doubt the source cited makes this claim, but it can't be true; the Beatles' Apple studio was in operation a year and a half earlier, in January 1969. Solicitr (talk) 16:52, 21 January 2015 (UTC)

The actual quote reads "Certainly the studio broke new ground as the first ever artist-conceived, owned, and operated studio." (Heatley 2009, p. 139.) It sounds like the type of throwaway quote that unfortunately finds its way into WP articles. However, Apple Studio had a shaky beginning and it seems that it wasn't really functional until later. Although The Beatles Encyclopedia[11] says it became operational in January 1969, George Martin, George Harrison, and Alan Parsons found major design and equipment problems (apparently only some rehearsals that later appeared in Let It Be (1970 film) were recorded there in 1969). After an eighteen-month renovation by Geoff Emerick, it opened in August 1970 and to the public on September 30, 1970, about the same time as Electric Lady. Frank Zappa ran his Studio Z around 1964–1965 and there are probably others. Since it doesn't really add much to the article, maybe just remove it or add it as a footnote? —Ojorojo (talk) 17:32, 24 January 2015 (UTC)