Talk:João Goulart

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Request for Citation[edit]

I would really like to see some citations concerning CIA warships off the coast of Brazil during the military coup of 1964.P97dav45 22:33, 9 September 2006 (UTC)

A Short History of João Goulart[edit]

João Goulart was a farmer. He was born in São Borja, a very large but unpopulated town in Brazil-Argentina border. São Borja was a politically active city since the 1920s. The "Prestes Column" (some army batallions that wandered the country, fighting all kinds of unequalty and barbarisms, between 1925 and 1927), departed from São Borja. The man who overthrew the "Old Republic" (a corrupt and anachronic type of Republic, that existed in Brazil from 1889 to 1930), Getulio Vargas, was born in São Borja.

João Goulart was the same kind of man of Vargas - he was a rich farmer who involved in politics. He depended on popular support to keep his power. And he did some "populist" reforms, so the people would support him. And, just like Vargas, Goulart expected that, when he could not get something approved in the Senate, he could count on people pressure to make things work.

Goulart was always involved on polemics. He was the Minister of Labor durin the Vargas 1950-1954 government. Getúlio Vargas had to fire him after the "Minimum-wage scandal". The country almost crumbled in civil war, just because Jango wanted to give the workers a 100% salaries raise. All wages would double! But that was a good idea. By that time, Brazil had almost no inner-market - the consumers were too poor and could not buy anything. The salaries raising would be good for economy. But right-wing politicians were against the idea, and president Vargas had to fire João Goulart before the whole government was overthrown.

After Getulio´s death in 1954, João Goulart was elected vice-president, during the rule of president Juscelino Kubitschek. Both were almost overthrown by the military. But, in the last moment, general Henrique Teixeira Lott, commander of the 3rd Army (the Army of Rio Grande do Sul state), mobilized his forces, ready for war. The generals who commanded other states divisions did not wanted to start a bloodbath (the whole south population was going to join the 3rd Army).

Then Juscelino and Goulart stayed in power from 1955 to 1960. In 1960, the populist "fennomenon" Jânio Quadros was elected president. João Goulart was once again elected for vice-president. (At that time, brazilians could vote for president and vice-president of different parties).

Jânio Quadros was a phenomenon. He was elected with the greatest number of votes ever (until then, of course). But his "friends" did not have the same luck: He was the president, but had almost no power. He had no allies in the Senate. But Janio had his most weird idea: he gave the highest honor medal of Brazil to the communist leader Che Guevara, and sent João Goulart to China. Then, he renounced his power. Janio tought that, being Goulart suspect of communism, the military would call his back to presidency, with dictatorial powers.

But Janio´s plan failed. The military tried to avoid João Goulart from becoming president. Another civil war was almost started. The population of Rio Grande do Sul prepared for war, and the army tried to bomb the Piratini Palace (building of the Rio Grande do Sul state government). The population rushed to the palace and the bombers had to retreat. João Goulart became president, and started his populist Vargas-like way of ruling.

In March 1964, the situation of all people was not good. Payments were too short, and economic crisis was thrownig the entire country into the risk of civil war. But Goulart had the solution. He made a speech announcing that he would do land distribution, wages increasing and some updates on work and taxes laws.

The military did not like the João Goulart´s ideas and there were several talks in the generals´ rooms, all about a possible coup to overthrown Goulart. But nothing was really happening. the troops in Rio de Janeiro were ready for the attack, and even the general of Rio Grande do Sul was neutralized. Everything was ready. But the military did not advance on their intent. Maybe, the idea was just of scaring Goulart, forcing him to give up from his left-wing plans.

But, in Minas Gerais state, when no one expected, general Olimpio Mourão Filho started to march forth to Brasilia (the capital). When the generals in Rio de Janeiro knew of Mourão´s attack, they had no choice but joining him. There was no way back, and no way to stop the whole thing. Even the generals who were not ready for the coup had to put their troops to march. On April 1st 1964, João Goulart was overthrown. He feld to Porto Alegre, capital city of Rio Grande do Sul state.

In the south, Leonel Brizola, the governor, offered protection to Goulart. The people was ready or battle. And the 3rd Army also joined Goulart´s side. Porto Alegre became the new "legal" Brazil capital for a few days and the southern forces were ready to fight and resist the coup. But João Goulart did not wanted to start a civil war. He was also more "mature" than Brizola, who was willing to fight until falling death. This bloodbath was avoided. The 3d Army returned to the barracks and the people left their weapons in the closet.

João Goulart, Leonel Brizola and many left-wing politicians left Brazil on April 1964. Goulart died of heart attack in Uruguay.

Brizola returned to Brazil in 1982. It is said that Brizola still has João Goulart´s "President´s Belt".

                               --- Fábio Burch Salvador - Brazil

—Preceding undated comment was added at 16:37, 12 March 2004.

Fifth paragraph sentence[edit]

From the 5th paragraph: "Also, the congressmen was ressented with loss of power and pressure made by Goulart in some occasions (like the "Comício das Reformas", Reform's rally)."

I'm trying to clean up the article, but I'm not sure what this sentence means. crazyeddie 18:25, 23 Dec 2004 (UTC)

It is interesting, I do not believe that the "Reform Rally" as you called it is in the article at all at the moment. This is highly irregular.--Kiyarrlls-talk 19:45, 28 November 2008 (UTC)

Parties and Conservative Quadros and Reforms[edit]

What political parties were involved? Could Quadros be described as a conservative? Also need more information on Goulart's reforms. crazyeddie 18:45, 23 Dec 2004 (UTC)

Vargas created two parties Brazilian Labor Party, and the Social Democratic Party (Brazil. Opposed was the National Democratic Union (Brazil). The Brazilian Communist Party was influential especially because of Luis Carlos Prestes. Janio was from the opposition, his candidateship was launched by Sao Paulo's PTN, but supported by the UDN. Since voters could choose President and Vice-President separately, it was a man from a different party and ideology who would have the Vice Presidency, namely Joao Goulart from the Brazilian Labor Party strongly leftist as the name suggests.--Kiyarrlls-talk 17:44, 5 December 2008 (UTC)

If Quadros was a conservative? He was from the UDN (right-wing party that wanted even more liberal economics and supported the coup (Carlos Lacerda, governor of Guanabara, journalist and politician of the UDN, wrote mean articles about Goulart all the time, and revolted his state when the coup came)) and wanted to prohibit bikinis. So HELL YEAH! On the other hand, he did give a medal to Che, but I suppose that was his way of saying to the people: "Look, People, I'm your pal, see?" --200.222.30.9 15:51, 19 October 2007 (UTC)

Quadros was a populist domestically but politically he advanced non alignment. His most significant characteristic was against the idea of adherence to either the Capitalist or Soviet blocks, and defended non alignment as advanced by the Asian-African Conference. It is the most important because it was the cause of attrition between the right wing establishment associated with capitalist block multinationals, who decried him as a communist for reopening diplomatic relations with the USSR and attempting to open a commercial relationship with countries of the socialist block.--Kiyarrlls-talk 20:07, 28 November 2008 (UTC)

Jarbas Passarinho paragraph[edit]

I am removing this paragraph:

According to senator Jarbas Passarinho, 1964 coup d´etat avoided the imminent communist threat represented by several world and local manifestations, such as: militar insubordination in 1963 in Brasilia, mariners in 1964; Fidel Castro´s, Che Guevarra´s, China, Soviet Union and Cold War. Even militaries wanted to move forward with democracy, since economy was growing and Medici was a very popular president. Passarinho states that Colombia still faces civil wars, and that Brasil could have had the same fate if it was not the military government. He also point out that although censorship was severe, it was Latin America´s softest since media[1] supported the coup and along with the Congress was still open and operating[2]. This public support was extended to entrepeneurs, business people, mid class, who also supported the National Renewal Alliance Party, the situationist party [3]. One could add a comment based in the country´s history which has a steady tradition of conservative governments and severe repression against social revolutions, since monarchy, right-wing republicanism and today´s neoliberalism

.

In addition to the very poor English, it is an apologia for the coup and has little to do with the actual subject of the article. ---fzirp, 18 July 2007

Iam sorry, my english looks much better than that of the article --which is awfull. In the first paragraph it is said that artists, and ordinary people were exiled. It is true but it offers only one side of the history --there is the side of reality. There was public support, from media, people, etc. Chine is mentioned and I did just the same by giving a world view, a global context.
Anyway, I do look forward to see you speaking/wrting in portuguese, french, german, italian...any other laguage.
--Ludovicapipa yes? 12:50, 18 July 2007 (UTC)

removed Section justifying coup[edit]

I've removed:


According to senator Jarbas Passarinho, 1964 coup d´etat avoided the imminent communist threat represented by several world and local manifestations, such as: militar insubordination in 1963 in Brasilia, mariners in 1964; Fidel Castro´s, Che Guevarra´s, China, Soviet Union and Cold War. Passarinho states that Colombia still faces civil wars, and that Brasil could have had the same fate if it was not for the military government. He also point out that although censorship was severe, it was Latin America´s softest since media[1] supported the coup and along with the Congress was still open and operating[2]. This public support was extended to entrepreneurs, business people, mid class, who also supported the National Renewal Alliance Party, the situationist party [3]. One could add a comment, based in the country´s history, that it has a steady tradition of conservative governments and severe repression against social revolutions, since the Monarchy, right-wing republicanism and today´s neoliberalism.

This content is already duplicated in the 1964 coup article. There's no reason to try to add opinion justification to the coup in an article about João Goulart. This is one of those clear "Main Article" sections.--Dali-Llama 04:35, 20 August 2007 (UTC)

I don´t agree. I find very imporant to offer a local and global overview. Ludovicapipa yes? 06:58, 20 August 2007 (UTC)
How is this a local or global viewpoint? This is the opinion of a man who was part of the dictatorship. It shouldn't be part of an article about a man who was deposed by the very same dictatorship, but certainly part of the article on the coup itself. You see no conflict of interest and lack of a neutral point of view in doing so?--Dali-Llama 08:16, 20 August 2007 (UTC)
A local and global historical overview, porvided by his statement. I think he didn´t state his opinion, quite the contrary, he talked abt historical facts (local and global). As for his guessing abt Colombia, it is assumed he is someone from the system. Ludovicapipa yes? 11:08, 20 August 2007 (UTC)
That's his opinion. Not that the facts happened, but rather that these events justified the coup. That's his rationale. So would you have a problem if I added a similar paragraph from someone opposing the coup saying that it wasn't justified?--Dali-Llama 17:43, 20 August 2007 (UTC)
No I don´t care if you add, as long as you cite and it looks proper and linked to the article. I fixed the link and it looks Ok. Ludovicapipa yes? 10:31, 21 August 2007 (UTC)
I will reinsert Passarinho´s statements. I think you rare inserting Gapari´s point of view and I don´t agree with that. Gaspari is someone who opposes militars --he is a communist and his point of view is that of someone against militars. Ludovicapipa yes? 11:44, 23 August 2007 (UTC)
I was very careful not to insert opinion, just narrative. I'm not trying to justify the coup or condemn it: just to explain the sequence of events. There's no opinion in what he's saying. When there is opinion, it should be clearly stated and prefaced (as is done in the passarinho quote).--Dali-Llama 12:40, 23 August 2007 (UTC)

Goulart, left-wing?[edit]

I know Goulart is populist, but do populist=left-wing in English? He was capitalist n' lovin' it, from what I know, being friends with Vargas (fascist sympathizer populist). He wasn't even a social-democrat! He fully supported the United States government diplomatically during the missile crisis, and he was a wealthy landowner. He was, at most, a centrist, and that's only because he promised (we can't even know for sure if that would really happen) to modernize the country's (capitalist) economy to avoid economical collapse, and give some benefits to workers in exchange for political support. Hardly the Godless commie-lovin' dictator-wannabe anti-American bastard the supporters of the coup wanted the world to believe he was. --200.222.30.9 15:51, 19 October 2007 (UTC)

Don't mind it anymore, problem solved. --200.222.30.9 20:01, 25 October 2007 (UTC)

Left wing and right wing first of all have different meanings in different times and in different places. In the temporal context of the Cold War the world was polarized, approximation to the Soviet Union meant "Communist", nationalism was seen as anti-USA and therefore pro-Soviet Union. Furthermore in regards to the location, Brazil had an oligarchical past which was opposed most stringently by the dictatorship. Thus while "Varguismo" seems to carry the right-wing aspects of dicatorship and industrialism, in the context of Brazil it does represent Left-Wing politics.--Kiyarrlls-talk 01:16, 30 October 2008 (UTC)

Jango's son claims:His father was murdered[edit]

This Brazilian site: [Carta Capital] from a Brazilian magazine writes that Jango's son claims Jango was murdered. I don't believe that Jango was murdered.Agre22 (talk) 20:05, 12 December 2009 (UTC)agre22

Jango was arrested, because he was drunk and naked?[edit]

I read in a Brazilian book that Jango was arrested in 1944, because he was drunk and naked. Is this true?Agre22 (talk) 20:05, 12 December 2009 (UTC)agre22

Violation of Neutral Point of View[edit]

I don't know enough about this topic to be comfortable making edits, but the last two paragraphs of the "military coup" section definitely do not adhere to a neutral point of view. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 184.162.103.75 (talk) 10:03, 10 June 2012 (UTC)

No they don't, and they are also redundant. I removed them. — McDutchie (talk) 09:44, 23 May 2013 (UTC)