Talk:Joe Namath

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How Did a Good Athlete Like Namath Avoid the Draft and Vietnam?[edit]

In preparing Namath's biography, the wider context cannot be ignored. Was Namath able to avoid the military draft by claiming bad knees? With millions of American boys being drafted and sent to war, how did Namath avoid having his sports career disrupted? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.44.153.18 (talk) 15:43, 5 December 2008 (UTC)

Anyone looking objectively at Namath's medical history would conclude that he did not have merely to "claim" bad knees, he definitely had bad knees starting with his injuries in college. Football is a game. If your knees give out you will be carried off the field to applause and another quarterback will get the chance to show what he can do. If you are a great passer (no one claimed Namath was a great runner) your team may spend tens of thousands of dollars try to repair your knees. The army is different. If your knees give out they will probably carry you off the field in a body bag -- and perhaps your comrades who needed you in fighting shape. If you are not killed, the army does not want to foot the bill to repair your preexisting knee condition. Around the same time Namath was playing there was a pro quarterback with only one good eye who never-the-less could complete passes well enough to be a star. The army just doesn't recruit one-eyed soldiers, either. I know it doesn't seem fair that these semi-handicapped athletes can grow rich while low-paid privates take bullets in battle, but war is not a game; football is.—Blanchette (talk) 05:48, 25 January 2009 (UTC)

Joe Namath's Broadway Joe's Stock[edit]

Please tell me how to redeem Broadway Joe's stock I have some and really need the money No will answer me Please contact me <redacted> Or Marie phone #<redacted> Thank you for your attention

Sorry to inform you, Mariemac, but Broadway Joe's Pub was dissolved in 1972 and its stock has no equity value. If you have stock certificate(s) in good good condition they have some collectors value. For dealers, do a web search on: Broadway Joe's Stock. This is not likely to solve your money problems, unfortunately.—Blanchette (talk) 05:10, 25 January 2009 (UTC)

Encyclopedia Entry or glowing biography?[edit]

Can anyone argue that this article is truly neutral and not just a fun read about a great sports figure? Please read this part of the entry on his last year with the Rams: "He did not play again, but redemption and a Hollywood ending was there for the taking. After a disastrous three quarters of turnovers and only trailing by seven points in the opening round of the play-offs, head coach Chuck Knox seemed ready to pull Pat Haden and insert Namath. Rams assistant coach Kay Stephenson said Joe looked great warming-up in the third quarter and advised Knox to put him in"

It is goofy and full of speculation and an overt desire for a hollywood ending. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.6.185.21 (talk) 10:34, 1 January 2010 (UTC)


Joe's drunken on-air comments[edit]

I edited this part of the section about controversy to reflect a more neutral point of view. The article seemed to blow the incident off by stating that he "jokingly" told the interviewer that he wanted to kiss her. How are we to know whether Joe was joking or not? The section also included a personal interpretation of what Joe meant by his "I couldn't care less about the team struggling," comment. This was also revised.

Nice edit. --Jaisonline 16:24, 10 February 2007 (UTC)

Movie and television career[edit]

The Movie and television career section really needs updating. For example, Namath also performed in numerous musicals and plays (one even on Broadway) usually to rave reviews. I'm currently reading the book "Namath" and will come back to edit / append to this section. --Jaisonline 19:00, 26 January 2007 (UTC)

He was in a film called Norwood with Glen Campbell in 1970. In one scene, he gets to toss a football. I'd read that the director didn't like the way he did it, and so proceeded to instruct Mr. Namath as to how to throw a football. WHPratt (talk) 16:31, 19 June 2012 (UTC)

Personal Life[edit]

Prob would make sense to create this section. It can contain refs to his marriage, two children and friendships (etc..) What do you all think? --Jaisonline 19:02, 26 January 2007 (UTC) I just read on ESPM.com they are making a moving of him. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.186.159.11 (talk) 23:16, 28 November 2007 (UTC)

I was wondering this too. I see this was mentioned 3 years ago. Every other Wikipedia article has one. Is he married now? I seem to remember him being a notorious playboy. Didn't he pose for playgirl magazine? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Robinrobin (talkcontribs) 14:26, 23 January 2010 (UTC)

  • Just get reliable sources and put it in. Marriages etc. are encyclopedic. Niteshift36 (talk) 17:22, 23 January 2010 (UTC)

Remembering.[edit]

As a kid, I distinctly remeber two things in contrast to this article. 1. The first contest between Green Bay and K.C. was already called the Super Bowl. 2. Joe Namath wore a Fu-Manchu with the lower lip "goatee" during the Super Bowl. I know, I could reproduce it perfectly in every magazine in our junior high library. Check the cover of S.I. covering Super Bowl III. "Super Hero Super Joe" showed him taking a hit from a squirt bottle. Also, I remember all the West-Texas stiff-upper-lip Republican types calling him a homo for wearing WHITE SHOES. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 65.38.10.84 (talk) 15:52, 1 May 2007 (UTC).

Joe Willy[edit]

While Howard Cosell's use of the nick name Joe Willy made it more famous, it began at the University of Alabama. There, One night after a winning performance with Tide on way to no. 1, Namath- a little boozed up, flashed for some coed, and that caused his being suspended 1-2 games. Then, he was known on campus shortly thereafter, as "Joe Willy".

While Namath was respected and liked on campus, he never came to party at the frequent frat parties as many of his team mates did; Why i dont know. But I guess this incident made him uncharacteristically shy.

/s "Memories from Bama" —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.195.78.238 (talk) 16:57, 20 January 2008 (UTC)

Category:Transcendental Meditation practitioners[edit]

Editors can look at this source, if you find it notable you can add something to the article and add the TM category also as you see fit. [1]http://www.latimes.com/news/la-me-maharishi6feb06,1,1158944.story

Namath listed on NFL Top 100[edit]

Joe Namath was ranked #100 on the NFL Channel's The Top 100 Greatest Players. (2010). Presenter: Spike Lee. Cjstanonis (talk) 19:53, 25 September 2010 (UTC)

Black teammates?[edit]

The article says there was some friction between Namath and other white players on the Tide over his defense of black teammates. Who were these black teammates? Considering it is believed that Alabama did not begin the integration of SEC football teams until 1970-1971, evidence of the existence of black players on the team during Namath's time at the University would be truly groundbreaking. Sadly, the source referenced, an ESPN page, doesnt even make the claim, or mention race relations at all. (Frankly, I dont expect fairness or accuracy where the Capstone is concerned. The BEST is always hated by the rest.) 69.180.19.217 (talk) 15:08, 14 November 2010 (UTC)ROLLTIDEROLL

College graduation date conflict[edit]

There are two dates given for his (eventual) college degree -- 2006 and 2007. 2006 is given regarding his mother's preference for a football path via attending college, but later 2007 is cited.69.113.81.241 (talk) 03:35, 7 July 2011 (UTC)

Not hall of fame numbers[edit]

65 rating ranks near the bottom of every teams qbs. not sure how he got into the NFL hall of fame. Seems to me he is all flash and no substance. May more Ints then TDs. Need to find an article supporting this to add to page. Namath is not Hall of Fall material for his on feild preformance. 24.101.172.61 (talk) 03:21, 22 November 2012 (UTC)

I'm not entirely sure what you're trying to accomplish here. Your opinion does not change the fact that he is in the HoF. -- The Writer 2.0 Talk 03:26, 22 November 2012 (UTC)

Yeah your right but I was looking for an article to support my idea that Namath didn't have the numbers to make HOF. It doesn't take much to see his numbers are crap. I believe a section stating Namath makes HOF spite his numbers would add to the article.24.101.172.61 (talk) 03:34, 22 November 2012 (UTC)

You might add that he was no threat to run for a first down, as most QBs have to do now and then to compensate, and that doesn't show up in the QB Rating. WHPratt (talk) 14:46, 22 November 2012 (UTC)
Okay, for expert opinion, you might look at The Hidden Game of Football, by Bob Carroll, Pete Palmer and John Thorn; Warner Books, 1989. The authors rate the all-time players using various statistics and nominate underrated and overrated ones. Their picks for ten Hall-of-Famers who shouldn’t be there are Doug Atkins, George Musso, Jim Langer, Johnny Blood, Walt Kiesling, Joe Namath, Paul Horning, Joe Guyon, Alex Wojciechowicz and Wayne Millner. That list is supposedly best-to-worst, which suggests that Namath is in their bottom five.
He certainly deserves a break for being famous, and he did a lot to put the AFL "on the map." Does that outweigh the numbers he put up? WHPratt (talk) 00:36, 30 November 2012 (UTC)