Talk:John Foxe

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject University of Oxford (Rated C-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject University of Oxford, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of the University of Oxford on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
Checklist icon
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
Note icon
This article has been automatically rated by a bot or other tool because one or more other projects use this class. Please ensure the assessment is correct before removing the |auto= parameter.
WikiProject Religion / Interfaith (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Religion, a project to improve Wikipedia's articles on Religion-related subjects. Please participate by editing the article, and help us assess and improve articles to good and 1.0 standards, or visit the wikiproject page for more details.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by Interfaith work group (marked as Low-importance).
 
WikiProject Christianity / Anglicanism / Calvinism (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Christianity, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Christianity on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Anglicanism (marked as Low-importance).
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Calvinism (marked as Low-importance).
 
WikiProject Biography (Rated B-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Biography, a collaborative effort to create, develop and organize Wikipedia's articles about people. All interested editors are invited to join the project and contribute to the discussion. For instructions on how to use this banner, please refer to the documentation.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 
WikiProject London (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject London, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of London on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Notes[edit]

"Second edition The Actes and Monuments ' accuracy was immediately attacked by Catholic writers like Thomas Harding and Thomas Stapleton but most notably in the Dialogi sex, contra summi pontificatus, monasticae vitae, sanctorum, sacrarum imaginum oppugnatores, et pseudomartyres (1566)."

This is a quote from the article. Thomas Harding in that case has a link to the article Thomas Harding. This must be a mistake. The article "Thomas Harding" is about a Lollard martyr, whereas the Thomas Harding who attacked Foxe was a Catholic apologist.

I'm not absoultely sure, but there must be two diff. Thomas Hardings. I will try to find that out. Maybe someone else can help.

Sorry for my bad English, I'm not a native speaker.

According to the Oxford DNB, there are two Thomas Hardings, one of whom was the author who attacked Foxe (1516-1572), the other a Church Historian of the 17th century, with no mention of the Lollard. Hackloon 14:24, 2 October 2006 (UTC) - having checked references tho, the Lollard seems quite well documented, so this must be a case where Wikipedia is ahead of the ODNB! Will try to get round to adding all three in due course... Hackloon 14:27, 2 October 2006 (UTC)

I asked my professor at university. He affirmed that the link is wrong. One Thomas Harding was a Lollard, who is also mentioned in Foxe's book whereas the other one was a Catholic apologist who attacked John Foxe but also John Jewel's book "An Apologie of the Church of England". The apologist by the way had already died before 1566. Therefore I removed the link.

Quite right to remove the link, but I think your professor is mistaken. Harding the apologist shows up as being appointed to some sort of jurisdiction over certain English monastic communities in 1570. For more details see ODNB on "Thomas Harding (1516-1572)" and "Thomas Harding" by H. de Vocht in The English Historical Review, 35 (1920) 233-44. Also of interest and relevance is the ODNB article on Jewell, which (inter alia) states that Harding's "Confutation of a booke intituled ‘An apologie of the Church of England’" was published in 1565.Hackloon 22:47, 4 October 2006 (UTC)

Thank you for clarifying that. My professor by the way was not wrong. I again confused the two Thomas Hardings. I originally intended to write: The Lollard Thomas died before 1566 which made it impossible for him to attack the book in 1566.

Any Lollard martyr would not only have died before 1566 but way before that year since Lollardy was around in the early 15th century, i.e. a century and a half earlier. Deposuit (talk) 18:50, 12 December 2011 (UTC)

Year of Birth?[edit]

Many sources say 1517. E.g John Foxe: a biography, written by Dr. Thomas Freeman, Research Officer for the John Foxe Project Team. I don't know if we have different dates because historically we are uncertain, or whether there's been a blunder that has been perpetuated - in any case, there is no citation here and I propose that the date be changed to 1517. StAnselm 12:58, 4 April 2007 (UTC)

The encyclopedia article from which the article was largely taken is probably mistaken. See Mozley, 12. I've corrected it.--John Foxe 18:30, 4 April 2007 (UTC)
Well, to be honest, I'm still not totally sure - if it's a mistake, it's a very widespread one. I think I'll do some more research and add a little bit on the uncertainty. StAnselm 01:03, 5 April 2007 (UTC)

Section on Accuracy.[edit]

Text refers to "unfashionable religious opinions." Wouldn't "unorthodox" or "subversive" be slightly better? I think that people were martyred for something that was more serious than just being unfashionable. William Tyndale translated "ekklesia" as "'congregation' rather than 'Church'" as his entry states. That was a direct challenge to the authority of the church and his was more than an opinion that was merely "unfashionable." "Unfashionable" seems to trivialize both the martyr's opinion and the objections to it.

"Dangerous" might even work. The doctrinal differences may seem insubstantial now but they could be very, very unhealthy then.

Just a thought. I made no change.

Richard Ong (talk) 05:45, 15 July 2011 (UTC)

I agree. The word "unfashionable" is too arch for the context. I've reworded thus: "Foxe was, after all, describing the burning of human beings for holding religious opinions disapproved by the state church."--John Foxe (talk) 13:41, 15 July 2011 (UTC)