Talk:John Lewis (politician)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Talk:John Lewis (U.S. politician))
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Alabama (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is part of WikiProject Alabama, an attempt to build a comprehensive and detailed guide to Alabama on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, you can edit this article, or visit the project page to join the project and/or contribute to the discussion.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 
WikiProject Georgia (U.S. state) (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Georgia (U.S. state), a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of the U.S. state of Georgia on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Biography / Politics and Government (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Biography, a collaborative effort to create, develop and organize Wikipedia's articles about people. All interested editors are invited to join the project and contribute to the discussion. For instructions on how to use this banner, please refer to the documentation.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the politics and government work group.
 
WikiProject U.S. Congress  
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject U.S. Congress, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of the United States Congress on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
This article has not yet been assigned a subject.
The options are: "Person", "People", "Place", "Thing", and "Events."

Notable Addresses[edit]

It surely would be a great addition to include references to major speeches that Lewis has made pertaining to his life-long pursuits of civil rights and justice. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.130.44.250 (talk) 00:10, 9 September 2008 (UTC)

Inconsistencies on Page[edit]

His birth date is given as 1960 (which I know is not correct). But it states below: "In 1961 he joined SNCC, the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee and the Freedom Rides. He was 21 years old." It also states: "In 1963, Lewis helped plan and took part in the March on Washington. At the age of 23, he was a keynote speaker at the historic event." I feel certain that he was born in 1940, not 1960. Sidney76 (talk) 16:34, 13 March 2012 (UTC)Sidney76

Currently this page says the following:

After leaving SNCC in 1966, he worked with various community-oriented organizations and later became community affairs director for the National Consumer Co-op Bank in Atlanta. His first run for elective office was in a 1977 special election for the 5th District, which resulted when Andrew Young was appointed as ambassador to the United Nations. He lost to Atlanta city councilman Wyche Fowler. In 1981, Lewis himself was elected to the Atlanta City Council. In 1986, Fowler made an ultimately successful run for the United States Senate, Lewis ran in the Democratic primary to succeed Fowler and defeated then-state senator Julian Bond, another national Civil Rights leader. This was tantamount to election in the heavily Democratic 5th District. Lewis was the first African-American to represent Georgia in either house of Congress since Reconstruction. He has been reelected nine times without serious opposition, often with over 70 percent of the vote. He has been unopposed for reelection since 2002.

The above contains inconsistencies such as if Julian Bond held the 5th District seat in 1977, Lewis could not have been the first blah blah... I am therefore correcting this record. (Writers often get into trouble when making claims for the first this or first that. Inevitably, some earlier holder of the title steps forward.) skywriter 22:38, 27 February 2006 (UTC)


My rewriting and editing of this page was for naught as it has been reverted by BlueBoy96, without explanation here or in answer to request for explanation on this and his own Talk page. I object to the reversion because the language is difficult to understand and leaves out the important factual emphasis that Walking With the Wind is a Civil Rights autobiography. I also object because the reversion is needlessly dense and difficult for the reader to understand.

For the record, this is what I contributed to this page but that has now been reverted.

After leaving SNCC in 1966, he worked with community organizations and was then named community affairs director for the National Consumer Co-op Bank in Atlanta.

Lewis first ran for elective office in 1977 when a vacancy occurred in Georgia's 5th District. A special election was called after President Jimmy Carter appointed then Rep. Andrew Young, D-Atlanta, to be ambassador to the United Nations. Lewis lost the race to Wyche Fowler, then a member of the Atlanta City Council. In 1981, Lewis was himself elected to the Atlanta City Council.

In 1986, Fowler ran unsuccessfully for the United States Senate. Lewis defeated Julian Bond, also a national Civil Rights leader, in the Democratic primary to succeed Fowler. Winning the primary was tantamount to election in the heavily Democratic 5th District. Lewis has been re-elected nine times without serious opposition, often with over 70 percent of the vote. He was unopposed for re-election in 2002 and 2004.

Since 1991, Lewis has been senior chief deputy whip in the Democratic caucus. He is a member of the Congressional Black Caucus and Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc..

Lewis is, according to the Associated Press, "the first major House figure to suggest impeaching George W. Bush," arguing that the president "deliberately, systematically violated the law" in authorizing the National Security Agency to conduct wiretaps without a warrant. Lewis said: "He is not King, he is president."[1]


Skywriter, it didn't say Julian Bond held the 5th district seat or any seat in the U.S. Congress; it says he was in the State (Georgia) Senate. (I didn't revert your changes though.) --63.150.149.226 04:46, 5 July 2006 (UTC)


-- It says in the page: 1990s In this decade, his worst winning percentage was in 1994 (69%). 2000s In this decade, his worst winning percentage was in 2000 (77%).[19] 2010 He won re-election with 74% of the vote, his worst winning percentage of his career.[20]

So if his winning percentage in 94 was 69%, then how is 74% the worst winning percentage of his career? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.92.53.74 (talk) 03:46, 28 November 2011 (UTC)

Civil Rights Biography[edit]

  • Walking with the Wind: A Memoir of the Movement by John Lewis with Michael D'Orso, 1999)

I would like to have participated in this project but this reversion to difficult to understand language, without explanation either in the Talk page or the Edit Summary means that unless one has time and inclination to engage in an editing war on what should be a routine matter, it was time wasted to have spent doing it in the first place. The action of this reversion discourages me from contributing to the congressional project. skywriter 18:19, 28 February 2006 (UTC)

I also would have liked to have participated in this article. How can the writer not have known that John Lewis was one of the "Freedom Riders" an action that took place before his more well known SNCC activities. This was his true baptism into civil rights activism. Oldpanther 01:23, 17 May 2011 (UTC) —Preceding unsigned comment added by Oldpanther (talkcontribs)
As far as I know, no one is blocking progress on the article. Please feel free to make improvments. Jesanj (talk) 13:42, 17 May 2011 (UTC)

Howard Zinn[edit]

4 entire paragraphs of this article are quoted from Howard Zinn. Would anyone object if I greatly reduced the Zinn quotes in this article? OCNative 07:42, 3 September 2006 (UTC)

That seems reasonable to me. The article oddly currently reads like it's more about Zinn than about Lewis, even talking about where Zinn's articles were reprinted. --Delirium 22:47, 9 November 2006 (UTC)

Almost two years later, the article still is mostly quotes from Howard Zinn and definitely should be re-written.--Gloriamarie (talk) 23:47, 16 October 2008 (UTC)

Wikiquote John Lewis[edit]

If your looking to access these quotes in wikiquote type in John Lewis just into the search box —The preceding unsigned comment was added by McNoddy (talkcontribs) 13:44, 7 March 2007 (UTC).--McNoddy 13:45, 7 March 2007 (UTC)

I removed the quotations from this page as they were repetitive when used in conjunction with WikiQuote. Please post on the discussion page any reasons for why they are necessary before changing the page back. Diablomarcus 03:28, 9 October 2007 (UTC)

Needs editing[edit]

I'm not going to do it, but as an interested reader, I suggest that the article be thoroughly edited. The last half, especially, is a series of disconnected sentences. Bellagio99 (talk) 00:37, 28 August 2008 (UTC)

Post 2008-election quote[edit]

The quote to CBS needs a reference or I'm going to delete it. I want to go back and verify that he was specifically speaking of the 1963 civil rights bill, or was he referring to a later civil rights bill, or was he referring to all the civil rights legislation in general. It's a good quote and I'd like to keep it, but I need to know what he actually said I your mom. —MiguelMunoz (talk) 01:15, 6 November 2008 (UTC)

John Lewis (U. S. politician)?[edit]

Why the spaces after U. S. ? Is that now the standard format? Kingturtle (talk) 13:09, 2 September 2009 (UTC)

Middle Name[edit]

Can his middle name be confirmed? I don't see it in his congressional biography and I see him referred to as Congressman John L. Lewis at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rabbi-david-saperstein/going-to-jail-to-fight-ge_b_194601.html Thanks! --Lbeaumont (talk) 15:13, 19 September 2010 (UTC)

Political positions[edit]

Source:[2] Jesanj (talk) 02:12, 18 February 2011 (UTC)

Invasion of Panama[edit]

Is anyone aware of a reliable source that documents Lewis' position on the 1989 United States invasion of Panama before it happened? Thanks. Jesanj (talk) 17:10, 15 October 2011 (UTC)

Graphic novel[edit]

It was announced this February that Congressman Lewis will be authoring a graphic novel called March, to be released by Top Shelf Productions some time in 2012.[3] I wasn't sure where that would best fit into this article, so I figured I should post about it here in the hopes that someone else will manage. Bobnorwal (talk) 15:48, 6 December 2011 (UTC)

repitious[edit]

The article repeats itself repeatedly. Under "Early life, education, career", a summary of the next section is given. This is repeated throughout. I find it disgraceful. Congressman Lewis is one of the most distinguished remaining civil rights leaders in this nation and this article does NO justice to him. 74.69.2.87 (talk) 13:05, 18 March 2012 (UTC)

Help request: Please clarify this section about the Freedom Riders[edit]

The following seems odd to me, but I am very tired [and so I (which I ironically left out at first--see why I'm asking for help instead of editing this myself?)] might be missing something:

"The Freedom Ride, originated by the Fellowship of Reconciliation and revisited by Farmer and CORE, was initiated to test a Supreme Court decision that desegregated interstate travel. The Freedom Riders traveled South challenging that decision."

If the Supreme Court decision actually was pro-desegregated interstate travel, why would they challenge it? So either the decision was anti-desegregation or (which I have a faint recollection of reading somewhere) the Freedom Riders were challenging the South's refusal to comply.

Thanks in advance! (I have a chronic illness which probably won't let me get back here, and so regretfully I often only can point things out. And talk page too much.) --Geekdiva (talk) 05:39, 25 April 2013 (UTC)

March: Book One[edit]

For people interested in the John Lewis article, let me mention that I just started a stub for The March trilogy, about the graphic novel that he just published. Feel free to contribute to it if you like. KConWiki (talk) 16:54, 25 October 2013 (UTC)