Talk:Josiah Bartlett

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Sources and editing[edit]

This section of the tak page is intended to describe sources of information in the article, and to discuss decisions about what to include or exclude.

Medical practice[edit]

The basic story of his medical career comes from a book by Rev. Charles A. Goodrich; "Lives of the Signers to the Declaration of Independence"; New York: William Reed & Co., 1856. His outline has ben adopted with some changes.

  • The 'epidemic' of 1754 and 1735 are backed up in the Kingston Town Records, typed transcription for 1732-1808 in the New Hampshire Historical Society at Concord.
  • Bartlett's discovery and tretment are backed up by his letters and orders for drugs, in microfilm of his correspondence.
  • Goddrich also provied an item I have discarded. He sites Bartlett's urgent need to treat his own child as something that impelled his search for a cure. Since Josiah and Mary's first child (also Mary) wasn't born until December 28, 1754 I discarded his description as fiction. It made his narrative more interesting than my write up, but given the other dates, it can't be true.
Lou I 20:30, 8 May 2004 (UTC)