Talk:Josiah Stamp, 1st Baron Stamp

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"Born in iniquity" quote[edit]

The earliest source I can find for this is Silas W. Adams,The Legalized Crime of Banking (1958), who gives no earlier source, only saying "as said in an informal talk to 150 University of Texas history, economics and social science professors, in the 20's". Adams calls Stamp "President of the Bank of England", which Stamp never was, and "the second richest man in the British Empire", which seems wildly inaccurate. The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography says his wealth at death was £163,548. That doesn't even put him in the top 5 wealthiest Brits to die in 1941--e.g. Edward Charles Grenfell's wealth was £880,331.

The quote also seems to imply that Stamp's wealth was from banking, but he didn't become a director at the Bank of England until 1928, after being an executive with chemical and railway companies. I highly doubt that this quote is valid. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Ken Hirsch (talkcontribs) 19:31, 7 January 2009 (UTC)

The quote from Stamp was edited to start with "The modern banking system manufactures money out of nothing. The process is perhaps the most astounding sleight of hand ever invented." This part is definitely not from Stamp. It is from L.L.B. Angas's Slump ahead in bonds (1937). It was quoted in Robert Latham Owen's National economy and the banking system of the United States (1939), p. 102, and can be found on Google Books quoted elsewhere in the 1930s and 1940s. The quote became entangled with Stamp's (alleged) quotation sometime in the 1990s.

KHirsch (talk) 03:21, 4 June 2009 (UTC)

I think it's obvious that Zeitgeist fans put these quotes in here and wait for us 'evidence' folks to remove it. I think we should remove the quote until we have some evidence for its existence. A youtube video is not evidence.

--TruthMayBeBoring (talk) 11:44, 17 January 2010 (UTC)

Civilian or Military Casualty?[edit]

I notice he is on a category list of British civilians killed in World War II, but wonder if that is strictly the case? Servicemen killed in air raids while on leave are classed as military casualties and listed by the CWGC where buried/cremated. While his wife and eldest son are separately listed among civilian deaths in their home Beckenham Borough, he is listed among military casualties buried at Beckenham Cemetery, as Colonel, General Staff. I have found (so far) no indication of military employment after the outbreak of the War, although it is on record in Who's Who etc that he was Colonel of the Royal Engineers Railway and Transport Corps, whose officers were railway engineers and administrators (he apparently qualifying as chairman of the LMS). I will check up this point with the CWGC.Cloptonson (talk) 20:34, 6 April 2013 (UTC)