Talk:Juan Davis Bradburn

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Featured article Juan Davis Bradburn is a featured article; it (or a previous version of it) has been identified as one of the best articles produced by the Wikipedia community. Even so, if you can update or improve it, please do so.
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Biography / Military (Rated FA-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Biography, a collaborative effort to create, develop and organize Wikipedia's articles about people. All interested editors are invited to join the project and contribute to the discussion. For instructions on how to use this banner, please refer to the documentation.
Featured article FA  This article has been rated as FA-Class on the project's quality scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the military biography work group (marked as Mid-importance).
 
Note icon
An appropriate infobox may need to be added to this article. Please refer to the list of biography infoboxes for further information.
WikiProject United States / Texas (Rated FA-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject United States, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of topics relating to the United States of America on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the ongoing discussions.
Featured article FA  This article has been rated as FA-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Texas (marked as Low-importance).
 
WikiProject Mexico (Rated FA-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Mexico, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Mexico on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Featured article FA  This article has been rated as FA-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Military history (Rated FA-Class)
MILHIST This article is within the scope of the Military history WikiProject. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the project and see a list of open tasks. To use this banner, please see the full instructions. Featured
Featured article FA This article has been rated as FA-Class on the quality assessment scale.

Text removed from the article[edit]

These are valid facts about the man, but I'm unsure if they fit in this article, so I'm leaving them here for now. Karanacs (talk) 19:57, 6 February 2009 (UTC)

In September 1831, Mexican authorities appointed George Fisher as the first collector of customs duties at the port of Galveston.[1] Fisher established a temporary office in Anahuac as he waited for offices and warehouses to be constructed near Galveston.[2] Fisher then ordered that all ship captains would have to file their papers at Anahuac, although this would require a 100 miles (160 km) overland trip from some of the ports.[3] The people near the port of Brazoria prepared a petition asking Fisher to rescind his order. Although he refused, Bradburn accepted the petition and sent one of his own men to the Brazos River to administer customs duties and examine the ships' papers locally.[4]

The following month, the American crew of the schooner Topaz mutinied while transporting Mexican soldiers intending to establish a new base near the Brazos River. The sailors killed the captain but were overpowered by the soldiers, who then managed to sail the ship to Anahuac. Bradburn jailed the crew, who claimed that they had done nothing, and that the Mexican soldiers had instead killed the captain. Texians, most of them American, believed the sailors and began writing letters to newspapers and friends in the United States disparaging Bradburn for believing the story. The New Orleans Louisiana Advertiser printed a letter in May 1832 naming the charges against the sailors "impossible", and blaming Bradburn for their imprisonment. It is likely that the letter was written by hotheaded lawyer William Barret Travis.[5]

  1. ^ Henson (1982), p. 72.
  2. ^ Henson (1982), p. 72.
  3. ^ Henson (1982), p. 75.
  4. ^ Henson (1982), p. 84.
  5. ^ Henson (1982), p. 93.