Talk:Julius Echter von Mespelbrunn

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Witch hunter[edit]

I've added a reference to an academic paper (Dillinger, 2009) claiming that Echter was involved in witch hunts.

The names of a small

group of prince abbots and prince bishops come to mind. Their respective territories, situated in a great region that today belongs to southern Hessen, northern Bavaria, and eastern Baden-Württemberg witnessed some of the worst witch hunts ever. Balthasar von Dernbach (prince abbot of Fulda), Johann Gottfried von Aschhausen (prince bishop of Bamberg and Würzburg), Johann Georg Fuchs von Dornheim (prince bishop of Bamberg, Aschhausen’s successor), Julius Echter von Mespelbrunn (prince bishop of Würzburg), Philipp Adolf von Ehrenberg (prince bishop of Würzburg, Echter’s nephew and successor), and Johann Christoph von Westerstetten (prince provost of Ellwangen, later prince bishop of Eichstätt). All of these so-called witch-bishops considered themselves the spearheads of Tridentine reform in Germany. For them, the fight against witches was clearly part of an apocalyptic battle

against evil and for the purity of the church.

I haven't put the article into Category:Witch hunting because of wp:UNDUE. --Northernhenge (talk) 14:48, 1 December 2012 (UTC)