Talk:Jupiter

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Sociological Concerns[edit]

With reference context of sociological consequences of reference the names of the Spheres ('Planets') of the Solar System & the Pagan Theological Deity references with additional contexts of evidences of the cultures of the "Sphere of Maia", or the "Sphere of Earth" ((of context favor for the Greek Language contexts ("Planet" really is linguistic suggestion that suggests "Fault")), really it's context that the Spheres of the Solar System be considered appropriately published with name contexts of reference Greek Pagan Theological Deity references with explicit context.

Perhaps you would like to speak more clearly. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 62.150.197.211 (talk) 14:46, 5 May 2015 (UTC)

Error Measurements[edit]

Many stated parameters are missing error measurements, such as the Mass. Would be helpful to students etc. to provide these (http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/?planet_phys_par)

The significant figures given indicate the error roughly. Any explicit error figures are bound to be vague. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 62.150.197.211 (talk) 14:48, 5 May 2015 (UTC)

Angular momentum[edit]

From Nebular hypothesis: “The main problem was angular momentum distribution between the Sun and planets. The planets have 99% of the angular momentum, and this fact could not be explained by the nebular model.”

So presumably Jupiter has a chunky proportion of the angular momentum of the solar system. It would interest some readers to include a sentence saying something like “Although Jupiter contains only 0.1% of the mass of the solar system, it has x% of the angular momentum.” But I don't know x (though guess it to be ≈ 60). JDAWiseman (talk) 18:35, 4 March 2015 (UTC)

Sun tides[edit]

> Jupiter's mass is 2.5 times that of all the other planets in the Solar System combined—this is so massive that its barycenter with the Sun lies above the Sun's surface at 1.068 solar radii from the Sun's center.

Is Jupiter sufficiently massive that it induces tides on the Sun? Is the sun slightly stretched towards/away from Jupiter, relative to the perpendicular equatorial direction? If this has been observed, it would fit well with the ¶ about Jupiter being big. If it exists in theory, albeit unconfirmed by observation, it would still be worth a mention (“In theory Jupiter’s gravity causes a tide on the sun of about … size, the sun’s diameter being that much larger in a line going through Jupiter than an equatorial line perpendicular to that.” JDAWiseman (talk) 09:40, 5 March 2015 (UTC)

Tides are different from having a center of mass outside the other body. The Moon induces tides on Earth, but the Earth–Moon center of mass lies inside Earth. --JorisvS (talk) 12:33, 5 March 2015 (UTC)
Agreed and known. But centre of mass outside implies that the secondary is a large secondary. If our little old moon can make water go up and down, can big old Jupiter make hydrogen plasma move? And would that be worth quantifying and saying? JDAWiseman (talk) 12:38, 5 March 2015 (UTC)
Tides are due to the gradient in the gravitational force, not the force itself. --JorisvS (talk) 14:56, 5 March 2015 (UTC)
Hmm. True, and something I had insufficiently appreciated. New suggestion: “Because of Jupiter’s great distance from the sun, the tides it causes on the sun are estimated to be only x µm.” JDAWiseman (talk) 15:02, 5 March 2015 (UTC)
This can be added if you find a reliable source that reports the phenomenon. But we can't put our own calculations or speculation in per WP:NOR. A2soup (talk) 16:20, 5 March 2015 (UTC)
Can’t find a good source. But because tides are inverse-cube Jupiter’s vertical tides on the sun are reportedly of the order of millimetres. JDAWiseman (talk) 17:57, 5 March 2015 (UTC)

Jupiter clears early Solar System[edit]

Is this information worth including in the article? News article describing Jupiter clearing the early inner Solar System of planets. http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/03/150324-jupiter-super-earth-collisions-planets-astronomy-sky-watching --Jcardazzi (talk) 23:59, 24 March 2015 (UTC)

Certainly, but an appropriate section ("Formation and migration") is currently missing. --JorisvS (talk) 09:32, 25 March 2015 (UTC)