Talk:Kaizen

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WebKaizen events: Why?[edit]

I've removed the following section because:

  • It seems like an ad
  • It introduces tools/diagrams we can't see, yet adds little to the article
  • It sites a book which I've found to be obscure.

WebKaizen Events, written by Kate Cornell, condenses the philosophies of kaizen events into a one-day, problem solving method that leads to prioritized solutions. This method combines Kaizen Event tools with PMP concepts. It introduces the Focused Affinity Matrix and the Cascading Impact Analysis. The Impact/Constraint Diagram and the Dual Constraint Diagram are tools used in this method.[1] wcrosbie (talk), Melbourne, Australia 06:36, 6 July 2012 (UTC)

Continuous Progress through Process Improvement (CPPI)[edit]

CPPI: Continuous Progress through Process Improvement

CPPI uses four very important principles. - Lean (Eliminate Waste) - Six Sigma (Minimize Variation) - Theory of Constraints (Strengthening Weakest Link) - Training within Industry (Standard Work)

http://www.slideshare.net/CharlesSLoganMBA/cppi#!

Most companies only use one or two above. In order to have a robust program improvement process you must use all 4 of the above methodologies. When all four are used together, you can see the difference!!! — Preceding unsigned comment added by C1shark (talkcontribs) 14:35, 23 September 2013 (UTC)

  1. ^ Cornell, Kate (2010). WebKaizen Events. Omaha, NE, US: Prevail Publishing. ISBN 978-0-9831102-1-7.