Talk:Karamojong people

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Untitled[edit]

User Samacia's recent contribution of the final paragraph raises a number of questions.

Firstly, is it intended to correct any of the statements in the first paragraph?

Secondly, if factual, it needs to be integrated into the first paragraph.

Thirdly, the Matheniko moved west and became the Iteso, Kumam and Langi? So who are the people called Matheniko who live in the part of Karamoja around Moroto today? It may be argued that linguistically the Matheniko are closer to the Jie than to the Iteso; it is the Bokora who are further west than the Matheniko and probably closer linguistically to the Iteso.

Fourthly, I question the implied assertion that the Jie were left behind as the Karimojong moved further south. Linguistics and oral history suggest rather that the Jie are a split-off from the Turkana.

Fifthly, it is said that the Karamojong consisted of SEVEN clans who later reduced into the Matheniko, Bokora and Pian of today.

Sixthly, there are a number of published works on the subject, though not always readily available or at affordable prices. We need to refer to them, notably:

Dyson-Hudson, Neville (1966). Karimojong Politics. Oxford: Clarendon Press Novelli, Bruno (1989). Aspects of Karimojong Ethnosociology. Museum Combonianum no. 44 Lamphear, J. (1976) The Traditional History of the Jie of Uganda. Oxford University Press , London Gulliver, P. H. (1955) The Family Herds. Routledge & Kegan Paul , London Cisternino M (Various) Knighton B (Various) Apalomita (talk) 23:07, 5 July 2009 (UTC)

The Karimojong language[edit]

The Karimojong language is called "ngakarimojong" not Karamojong as commonly referred to. Also referring to the Karimojong people as the Karamojong may not be right, but "ngikarimojong" for many and ikarimojongait for one. It is the place or region referred to as "Karamoja" — Preceding unsigned comment added by Totoapacholiya (talkcontribs) 13:31, 8 December 2011 (UTC)