Talk:Karl Weyprecht

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Probable island named after Weyprecht[edit]

"Pritchett" Island, an island in the Franz Joseph Archipelago, Ostrov Pritchetta (Остров Притчетта), was probably named after him. The name of this island is very likely a corruption of Karl Weyprecht's name (the initial syllable "We" having disappeared). Since Payer, the other of the two leaders of the Austro-Hungarian North Pole Expedition, has an island named after him further to the northeast in the same archipelago (Payer Island), it is very unlikely that in Franz Josef Land Weyprecht would not have an island named after him too. Mohonu (talk) 06:37, 1 September 2008 (UTC)

And most likely you are correct. When you remove from the previous text the words "probably", "likely" and "unlikely" then the text can go into the article and you will have my back up and support. But in order to remove those words you will have to find sources, and that is what I am asking. You might want to check WP:NOT and WP:CRYSTAL to see what in general I am talking about. Thanks, Miguel.mateo (talk) 07:10, 1 September 2008 (UTC)

The mystery of "Pritchett" Island[edit]

You are right, if a source was available, I would not have written "probably" and "very unlikely" in the quote concerning "Weyprecht Island" . It is indeed a mystery why there is no Weyprecht Island in Franz Joseph Land. Both Julius Payer and Karl Weyprecht had the same status as co-leaders of the Austro-Hungarian Polar Expedition, which first discovered and named most islands of the archipelago. Since both were as important, logically if there is a Payer Island, there should be a "Weyprecht Island" as well.

What is sure, however, is that there is no person called "Pritchett" among the groups after which most Franz Joseph Land's islands were named: Austro-Hungarian nobility, Arctic or Polar Explorers, Academicians having studied the Arctic, and Russian names. "Pritchett Island" is one of the three islands in Franz Josef Land the origin of whose name is unknown (another one is May or Mey Island), whose transliteration from the Russian is uncertain.

There is already a lot of confusion arising from the translation of Russian geographic names.[1] However, the complexities involving transliteration of geographical names from Russian become compounded in the particular case of Franz Josef Archipelago because the initial names of the islands were not Russian. Therefore many names of the group were first deformed because the first 19th century and turn of the century charts (in German, Norwegian or English) were translated into Russian. Decades later (World War 2) the names of islands were deformed again in the navigational maps when they were translated back into German or English from the Russian. Heiss Island (including the Komsomol Islands), for example, was clearly "Hayes Islands" in Fridjof Nansen's turn-of-the-century map (right west of Wilczek Land in the lower right quarter of the map)[2]Mohonu (talk) 07:41, 1 September 2008 (UTC) Mohonu (talk) 07:41, 1 September 2008 (UTC)

Another intriguing thing of Fridjof Nansen's map is that he did not put any name to both Payer Island and "Pritchett" Island.Mohonu (talk) 07:49, 1 September 2008 (UTC)