Talk:Kasuga-zukuri

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

What makes this style special is the use of small 1x1 building, open on one gable side with an eave. Whether it uses two, three, or four buildings is just an option. It was common for archaic buildings to have non-square shapes. The term ken usually denotes the negative space between the pillars, and is irrelevant to actual distance. Not all shrines have cypress roofs, if they are preferred. Neither are they always curved, Ise style isn't just to mention the best known. The coloring of the building described here is not specific to this style. This article has to make it clearer what are common to shinto shrines regardless of the style described here, what are the specifics about Kasuga style, and what particular things are about Kasuga Shrine.


Reply[edit]

Hi, please remember to sign your messages, and thanks for the very useful input.

What makes this style special is the use of small 1x1 building, open on one gable side with an eave. Whether it uses two, three, or four buildings is just an option.

I had misunderstood my source: it was describing Kasuga Taisha, and not the style. I got rid of the material and modified the definition.

About the ken, I explain in a footnote what it is and there is an internal link. I feel no change is necessary.

The words "as in all shrines", referred only to the kirizuma yane. I now realize they were confusing. I removed them. Thanks for taking the trouble of pointing out these problems to me. Frank (Urashima Tarō) (talk) 00:14, 4 August 2010 (UTC)