Talk:Khaki

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Germans not wearing khakis?[edit]

I was shocked when I read this site: [1]. ATTENTION GERMAN WIKIPEDIANS: do Germans really don't wear khakis? Please confirm. I had just posted on my blog if there is any Hitler or East German connection with khakis. This blogger might've looked like stupid when he wore his khakis one day. Chitetskoy (talk) 20:45, 18 February 2009 (UTC)

I wouldn't worry about a random blogger. oknazevad (talk) 17:17, 22 March 2013 (UTC)
Could be true. If I understand "khaki pants" correctly, I would say the combination of elegant, creased dress pants with such a light color is quite unusual in Germany. When I see those pants a picture of an old American man wearing a panama hat and a pink polo shirt springs to my mind immediately. Jeans on the other hand are not so uncommon in shades of brown/sandy/khaki. But note the comment below, which says there's no such thing as "khaki pants". There's chinos and those are not very common in Germany. Also people might just have been outraged at his socks and not his pants, as white socks have been a major fashion no-no in Germany for some decades. But I don't think any of this should go in the article, which is after all about the colour khaki. --BjKa (talk) 13:10, 29 October 2013 (UTC)

There is nothing here on material or weave[edit]

Khaki is not a separate material. My dictionary gives: "a textile fabric of a dull brownish-yellow color, in particular a strong cotton fabric used in military clothing." So khaki = cotton pure and simple, in line with its Indian origin. The outside references below do not say a word on the material used. I strongly suggest to take out any and all reference to khaki as a material: British khaki uniforms in WWII and later were made of wool; khaki army shirts are normal cotton shirts (I wore them in the RNLA) ; khaki slacks can be purely synthetic.

If one wants to make khaki a material, please give evidence. This article does nothing of the sort. and should be considered a mistake. VNCCC (talk) 00:56, 25 August 2010 (UTC)

And that's the problem with the seperate articles: there's no such thing as a material called khaki. Khaki is a color (a tan with a hint of green, darker in British usage than American), and the dressy casual trousers that originally came in that color are often called "khakis" even when they are other colors because they are still constructed the same in material (which is chino cloth) and cut. But there is no cloth that is distinctly khaki. We really ought to clear this mess up by a)merging this article with the one on the color, and b) including proper links to chinos in the text. This will make the accurate description clear: the pants are called chinos (because they're made of chino cloth), khaki is the color that they often are (though they also commonly come in stone grey, olive green, navy blue and black). oknazevad (talk) 01:51, 13 August 2012 (UTC)

Pants/Trousers[edit]

Throughout the article one finds this: "pants/trousers". Is there some (clever?) reason for this? 188.155.160.78 (talk) 15:49, 22 October 2011 (UTC)

Pakistan Army[edit]

Note; The article needs a section on Pakistan army's use of Khaki uniform from independence (1947) till recent change to camouflage. --lTopGunl (talk) 19:37, 15 August 2012 (UTC)

Not really; maybe it belongs in the Pakistani Army article, but a lot of militaries use shades of khaki in uniforms, and Pakistan making a change isn't notable enough to an article that is supposed to be very general. oknazevad (talk) 17:45, 27 August 2012 (UTC)

Green in other Countries[edit]

I removed the sentence
In French, and German, for example, "khaki" refers to a much darker olive drab-style military green.
re German: I disagree. I have never heard "khaki" describe a shade of green in Germany. See also de:Khaki
re French: fr:Kaki (couleur) differentiates beween plain kaki and vert kaki ("green khaki"). Therefore kaki is predominantly not green in French.
--BjKa (talk) 13:10, 29 October 2013 (UTC)