Talk:Kilogram

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Equivalency to Grams[edit]

I expected to see an equivalency to grams in the heading text, and didn't. Is a kilogram exactly 1000 grams? If not, there should be a note and link to the deeper discussion. Charles Merriam (talk) 23:47, 1 December 2013 (UTC)

Over 214 years ago[edit]

I have a question regarding the statement "scientists over 214 years ago managed to make the mass of the Kilogram of the Archives..". It appears that the comment was added in 2009.

I'm interested in how such references are maintained since there isn't a clear indication of the date of the event or the date of the statement. I've found that Wikipedia recommends the use of the As of {{{1}}} template when making a remark which may become outdated. However, I'm not sure if it applies to such a case as this.

Should this reference be updated now? I think it should be 219 years ago. However, maybe it should be left as is because it's not critical to understanding the article.

That age is not hard text, it is displayed using {{age}} which is rendered correctly as 215. LeadSongDog come howl! 01:38, 18 September 2013 (UTC)
I see that now :). Now that this is resolved, do I delete this section of the talk page?12.27.253.143 (talk) 15:18, 18 September 2013 (UTC)
No need, after 100 days a bot will automatically move the thread to the archives. — Reatlas (talk) 09:32, 19 September 2013 (UTC)

What is correct?[edit]

In this article it is written both "4°C" and "4 °C" (with a blank in between). I know it is not of any great importance, but I wonder what is correct, gramatically. Adville (talk) 11:58, 24 September 2013 (UTC)

We normally follow wp:MOSNUM, though it differs in some such details from formal SI usage. Grammar doesn't really enter into it.LeadSongDog come howl! 22:06, 24 September 2013 (UTC)
Thanks! Adville (talk) 08:34, 25 September 2013 (UTC)
In this case it's most correct to insert a non-breaking space between the value and the unit symbol. My bigger question is with the number itself, and consistency with the article on the litre. Apparently the original definition of the gram (1795) was "the mass of 1 cubic centimetre of water at the melting point of ice", i.e. presumably 0 °C. This would make 1 kg equal to the mass of 1 cubic decimetre of water, i.e. 1 litre, at 0 °C. This is from http://www.metrodiff.org/cmsms/index.php?page=18_germinal_an_3 --- 4 °C is the temperature at which water is densest, and it relates to a later redefinition of the litre from 1901 in which it was defined as the volume of 1 kg pure distilled water at its maximal density. Archon 2488 (talk) 00:37, 14 October 2013 (UTC)

Measurement incorrect[edit]

Kilogram is 10cm^3 and not 1cm^3 — Preceding unsigned comment added by 65.34.84.175 (talk) 13:23, 21 June 2014 (UTC)

This is nonsense. Do not put this nonsense into the article or you will be blocked. Jc3s5h (talk) 19:50, 21 June 2014 (UTC)