Talk:Kilwa Kisiwani

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Consistency with Kilwa Sultanate[edit]

The Kilwa Sultanate page has some discrepant dates for the early history of Kilwa that should be resolved. And once that has been straightened out, the History section of this article probably needs a better introduction as well. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.51.110.77 (talk) 15:03, 18 July 2013 (UTC)

It remained in Portuguese hands until 1512, when an Arab mercenary captured Kilwa and expelled the Portuguese[edit]

This is untrue, it was captured by Arabs after the Portuguese abandoned the Fortress due to high maintenance costs

Sources[edit]

As part of a project, I plan on using the following sources to expand on the archaeology section of the article:

Elkiss, Terry H. 1973 Kilwa Kisiwani: The Rise of an East African City-State. African Studies Review. 16(1):119-130.

Fleisher, Jeffrey and Stephanie Wynne-Jones 2012 Finding Meaning in Ancient Swahili Spatial Practices. African Archaeological Review 29:171-207.

Pollard, Edward John 2008 The Maritime Landscape of Kilwa Kisiwani and its Region, Tanzania, 11th to 15th Century AD. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 27:265-280.

Pollard, Edward 2008 Inter-Tidal Causeways and Platforms of the 13th- to 16th-Century City-State of Kilwa Kisiwani, Tanzania. Te International Journal of Nautical Archaeology 37(1):98-114.

Wynne-Jones, Stephanie 2007 Creating Urban Communities at Kilwa Kisiwani, Tanzania, AD 800-1300. Antiquity 81:368-380. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Gallivantingfox (talkcontribs) 03:27, 14 October 2014 (UTC)

So I started adding some information in the archaeology section. I plan to add more and maybe tidy up what I just added. It is for a school project (as was already established). GallivantingFox (talk) 01:02, 28 October 2014 (UTC)

Thank you very much for improving the article. It was certainly in need of more attention. But I have to say that one of the comments - on the cultivation of cotton - pricked my ears. This is the first time I heard of locally grown cotton and found that quite surprising. Indian cotton was the major import into Kilwa - indeed, one of their primary lines of business. I have never heard of cotton being grown on the Swahili coast, and a lot about the cotton trade with India. Cotton is a very thirsty crop, and I was under the impression that Kilwa was quite parched. I don't have access to Pollard's article, so I can't check if this is merely a tentative conjecture or if there is more evidence of cotton growth. But, if true, is a very important statement. Since you seem to have lots of resources, is this only in Pollard? Walrasiad (talk) 17:03, 6 November 2014 (UTC)

The Pollard article is the only one that has made mention of cotton out of the articles I have read so far. The Elkiss article is more of a historical account, and the Fleisher and Wynne-Jones articles talk mainly about the layout and social stratification of Kilwa as can be seen by the types of imported goods and the building materials used, as well as the use of space. I will definitely keep my eye open for more sources to validate Pollard's statement. I plan on doing more work on the article in the near future, but unfortunately not much regarding the archaeology has been published recently, and what has been published has all been written by the same individuals. Here is an excerpt from the Pollard article mentioning cotton cultivation along the Swahili coast: “Although not grown today, Sutton (1998, p. 123) reported the soils of the Kilwa region to be suitable for cotton, being required for sail making as well as clothing, Spindle whorls, dating back at least to the 12th century, are evidence for cotton spinning. Sixteenth century authors… reported Kilwa and the mainland to have been fertile growing palms, maize, cotton, betel, oranges…” The excerpt is from page 268 in his article "The Maritime Landscape of Kilwa Kisiwani and its Region, Tanzania, 11th to 15th Century AD", which is cited above in my original post to this talk page. GallivantingFox (talk) 19:33, 6 November 2014 (UTC)