Talk:Kirillo-Belozersky Monastery

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Protest Movement In Kyrillo - Belozero Monastery[edit]

Valgetjärvi is the place of interest. We found here the Rurik´s brother as local chieftain for pagan Finno Ugrian Vepsä (Veps) tribe nominated by Rurik himself. Why? Of cource, because all three brothers understood Finno Ugrian languages. Thus Sineus (Simo) establised himself to Valgetjärvi. All went well and Vepsäs (Veps) created a Eastway from Äänisjärvi following the course of Vytegra River to Valgetjärvi. From the southern shore they used Seksna River to reach Mologa River and then south to the confluence where they appeared to the lands of Meri / Merä (Merja) tribes and finally reached Valgia (Valka) River which eventually reached the Caspian Sea. The Vepsä villages flourished and silver, gold and diamonds were exchanged against furs and slaves for Middle East markets in Bagdad Caliphate. In 907 and 944 they even took part to Kywa Rosh Miklagard war raids and obtained some benefits for their Eastway commerce. Their own representantive, Istervo Muntti (Istr Amindoff), was one who signed the intermediate peace treaty with Byzantium. Sometime in 1050 the Christianity stepped in to the these areas in form of Greek Orthodox Fate. Those few inhabitants of Eastern Slav origin (Severniis?) took baptist, but the Vepsäs (Veps) continued their pagan nature religion. There was a fierce fight in 1071 against the Kywa Tribute Expedition. After the fall of Moscow in 1238 the descendants of Sineus founded to Valgetjärvi a small Principality. When the Commercial Republic of Novgorod received the right to collect fur taxes after 1323 the Valgetjärvi saw more ethnic Russian traders and serfs who had escaped from their pajars (bojars) and had seeked new own land from these large forests and lake areas. The first Orthodox Monastery was built in 1379 by Kirill Belozersk (Kiril Valgetjärveläinen). In 1364 there was a general uprising against the Novgorodian tribute collectors. They withdrew but returned later and killed all Vepsä (Veps) males in area surrounding Valgetjärvi. The Vepsä (Veps) women and children were taken slaves and had to choose to be baptized to the Orthodox Fate or die. Of cource many choose live and their children were renamed with Russian new names. In 1397 a new revolt started against the Novgorodians but it was smashed with a big Novgorodian army and again a massacre followed in the area. The Vepsä (Veps) villages were emptied and resettled by Muscovites who now entered into the area. Valgetjärvi turned to Russian Belozero. Little later the Srigolniks from Muscovite Principality appeared to the Monateries in Belozero. They wanted Orthodox Church to prevent the bojars to treat their serfs more humanly. In Moscow they were known "Zavolskije startsy" and in Volga area these monks were known as "netjazalei". Their spiridual leader was monk Nil Sorskij (Nikolai Maikov). He lived in a small house at the shore of Sora (Gravel) River and teached his followers whose most influenced person was monk Vassian "Kosoi" (Vasilij Ivanovitsh Patrikejev 1470 - 1531) a former Russian diplomate and the chief of Fedor Vasiljevitsh Kuritsyn who was also active member with Ivan Vasiljevitsh Kuritsyn, Mitja Konoplev, Ivan Maksimov and many others. All others, except Vassian who managed to to escape from Belozersk Monastery to Lithuania, were burned alive inside iron cage in Moscow in 1504 as a warning for other monks and Monasteries not to follow Vassian "Kosoi´s" teachings.

In general, Kirill Belozerks Monastery was a home for new revolutionary thinking inside the Orthodox Church. As a result of the active participating to Srigolnik movement the Tsar founded "Opitshniks" to smash down the widely spread movement in Northern Russia.

JN

Links to Goritsky Convent?[edit]

While trying to figure out who Fool-for-Christ St. Asenatha of Goritsky was today, I happened upon this wikipedia page. I understand that it's start-class, and needs a lot of work that I can't perform. Frankly, I'm half a world away geographically, but as a history buff I am fascinated (and frustrated). Can someone whose Russian is better than mine at least put links to the Russian wikipedia pages about these places? It seems that for nearly a half century, the same museum authorities have been operating this monastery and the (female) Goritsky Convent less than 15 miles away. Jweaver28 (talk) 19:32, 19 April 2013 (UTC)

We have the page on the Goritsky Convent, Goritsky Monastery (Goritsy), and links to the Russian pages are always on the left.--Ymblanter (talk) 19:51, 19 April 2013 (UTC)