Talk:Kkakdugi

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Seasoning[edit]

Hi, the seasoning for all kimchi is done with red chili powder, never with whole red chilis as far as I know. You can find whole green chilis and slivers of red chili in dongchimi, but then they are ingredients in their own right, not seasoning. --Kjoonlee 09:02, 13 April 2008 (UTC)

Done. Is it always a fine powder or is the somewhat coarser variety used? I see both in the Korean grocery store. Badagnani (talk) 10:30, 13 April 2008 (UTC)
I'm not sure (I've never made kimchi, hah) but if you look at the current photo on the article it shows coarse powder, and the first thing that comes to my mind when I think of kkakttugi is the coarse powder. ... But maybe both are used... Hmm.. --Kjoonlee 14:26, 13 April 2008 (UTC)

Carrot ggakdugi[edit]

Moved to talk; is it notable enough for the article?

Badagnani (talk) 10:31, 13 April 2008 (UTC)

It's about as notable as a man biting and injuring a dog, as they say in Korea. Maybe it's been done, but it's not widespread. --Kjoonlee 14:31, 13 April 2008 (UTC)
Actually, in Korea the saying actually goes "If a dog bites a man, that's not newsworthy. But if a man bites a dog, then that's newsworthy." However, I don't think that's very newsworthy either, which made me a bit confused. --Kjoonlee 19:50, 13 April 2008 (UTC)

Etymology[edit]

What is the etymology of this word? Badagnani (talk) 10:41, 13 April 2008 (UTC)

I have no idea. 싹뚝싹뚝 sounds a bit similar, but that might be a coincidence. 깍둑썰기 means to cut food ingredients into small cubes, but that might come from 깍두기, not the other way round. --Kjoonlee 14:29, 13 April 2008 (UTC)
I have a reference on the etymology, so if you want to add the section, refer to this.

깍두기의 유래는 《조선요리학》을 보면 200년 전에 정종의 사위인 영명위(永明慰) 홍현주(洪顯周) 부인이 임금에게 처음으로 깍두기를 담가 올려 칭찬을 받았다고 한다. 당시에는 각독기(刻毒氣)라 불렀으며, 그후 여염집에도 퍼졌다.naver/doosan encyclopedia --Appletrees (talk) 14:34, 13 April 2008 (UTC)

Thanks, my translator can't make sense of it but if you think it explains the origin of this word, it would be great if you could add that, or provide an English translation, so we can add this to the article. It's such an interesting word, and I'd like to help explain to our readers where it comes from--and, for example, why the word "mu" isn't part of it. Badagnani (talk) 21:27, 13 April 2008 (UTC)

Hmm...I add the origin section. The google translation tool is very clumsy for Korean language. The etymology is strongly related to the verb, 깍둑썰다 ggakduk sseolda. Actually, I asked Kjoonlee to translate the info into English because he is a native speaker of both English and Korean so he could've done better than me. --Appletrees (talk) 22:31, 13 April 2008 (UTC)

What was Hong Seon-pyo's source? Was there a Joseon text that gave this story, or was this just something he heard as an old wive's tale in a kitchen somewhere? Badagnani (talk) 22:38, 13 April 2008 (UTC)

Hong Seon-pyo seems to be a descendant of the princess and Hong family. --Appletrees (talk) 22:43, 13 April 2008 (UTC)

I'll look into it later this week. I need to see if there are other sources, including a famous (or so I hear) essay by 윤오영 about ggakdugi. --Kjoonlee 16:15, 15 April 2008 (UTC)

I've had some brief looks, and there's nothing I can find that really adds something to the current article. 각독기 seems to be a misnomer IMHO, because it's just as possible it was known as 각둑기, but was written 각독기 because there's no Hanja for 둑. (Which is also why 기역, 디귿 and 시옷 are not called 기윽, 디읃 or 시읏; there's no hanja for 윽, 읃 or 읏.) --Kjoonlee 13:24, 1 May 2008 (UTC)

Maybe, but you don't provide any (reliable) source for your claim but I did. That matters. --Appletrees (talk) 13:29, 1 May 2008 (UTC)
Hey, calm down. I was just stating my opinion. However, do we have reliable sources saying that the Korean people used /ɡakdokɡi/ at that time? We don't. --Kjoonlee 13:41, 1 May 2008 (UTC)
???????? I'm very calm, so the mention of 'calm down' is not appropriate. Unfortunately, the source I brought up is that by far the only available one (for me) to explain the etymology. I am not that sensitive to differentiate its transition, so am O.K with the current status. --Appletrees (talk) 14:09, 1 May 2008 (UTC)

Revised romanization[edit]

Is the Revised Romanization given in the box correct? Why does it differ from the spelling of the title of the article? Badagnani (talk) 21:59, 1 May 2008 (UTC)

  1. ^ Club Korean Kimchi http://cafe.naver.com/koreakimchi/63