Talk:Koeksister

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Requested move[edit]

Please move this article to "Koeksister" as the word "koeksuster" does not exist in Afrikaans - you can check it in any dictionary. This is a common spelling error among English speakers in SA. Unfortunatly I cannot move it myself. Graaf1 21:24, 7 November 2007 (UTC)

I second this. The "Handboek vir die Afrikaanse Taal" is pretty much the authority on this one, and lists Koeksister and Koesister, and I believe the former is more widely used.--Lionelbrits (talk) 23:48, 17 December 2007 (UTC)
Done. -- RG2 02:07, 18 December 2007 (UTC)

Origin of the word Koeksister[edit]

Since I am a total Wiki n00b (my first contribution) I will be super careful. The origin of the word koeksister is problematic since it makes no sense, neither in Dutch nor Afrikaans. Firstly, regarding the suggestion in the stub, although it seems like it, 'koekje' is not the diminutive of cake in spoken Dutch. It's real meaning is cookie (American) or biscuit (British). A 'koekje' is certainly not a little cake, just as a 'cookie' is not a little cook. A koeksister has some distant resemblance to a biscuit, but is more like a Spanish 'churro' or Indian 'Jalebi', in other words a type of doughnut. It is the 'sister' bit that causes problems, since this word has the same meaning in English, Afrikaans and Dutch and makes little sense in the context. There are references all over the web that suggest it comes from the Dutch word 'sissen', which means to sizzle or to hiss, presumably a reference to the reaction of the dough to being placed in hot oil. [Ref example: http://www.allwords.com/word-koeksister.html]. The mystery lingers on. --Klipkap (talk) 15:55, 29 February 2008 (UTC)

I think the word "sister" in koeksister refers to the fact that there is two "koekies" or doughnuts whatever you like, which is plaited which makes them sisters??? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 94.192.99.83 (talk) 20:08, 16 June 2009 (UTC)

Recipe[edit]

This is one of countless recipe variations for koeksisters, and differs from any I have known or used, in its heavy reliance on syrup. I was unaware that Wikipedia food pages strive to provide recipes at all, rather than information on the food item. There are many sites that offer different recipes and having it on the Wikipedia page seems very strange to me. It also makes it seem like the definitive recipe, which it isn't. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 194.72.140.202 (talk) 09:03, 20 April 2009 (UTC)

Best eaten cold?[edit]

I dispute this. Case in point: I like them warm. --Kristian 10:12, 16 December 2011 (UTC) I agree with Kristian, my preference is warm and the South African friends who made these for me prefer them warm alsoLueds (talk) 06:41, 23 March 2012 (UTC)

I prefer them cold, but taste is subjective. Have removed the sentence from the page. --NJR_ZA (talk) 08:59, 23 March 2012 (UTC)

Maybe "infused" would be more accurate than "coated"?[edit]

The koeksisters I had as a child in South Africa were infused with syrup, not coated. The hot, deep-fried, plaited dough was placed immediately into cold syrup (not hot) so that hot dough drew in the syrup and it infused through the entire koeksister. The syrup was not just on the surface. Some recipes recommend keeping the bowl of syrup in ice water or even in ice to keep it cold while you place the hot, just-fried dough into it. (i.e. Two recipe examples: http://www.capetownmagazine.com/recipes/traditional-koeksisters-recipe/106_22_18670 or http://www.justeasyrecipes.co.za/2009/08/27/koeksisters/). 131.215.67.47 (talk) 20:01, 8 October 2013 (UTC)