Talk:Kukicha

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This article has comments here.

Why is it written that Kukicha means "sword energy"? Kukicha is literally translated as stalk tea. It is also known as winter tea. Thoughts anyone? Kukicha is a favorite winter tea as when it is dry fried it strengthens the Kidney the "winter" organ§§§


I am having the "Kukicha tea" page redirect here as that article is redundant. Here is all that was on that page before it was removed:

Kukicha is also called stick tea owing to the long thin shape of this leaf-stalk blend. The tea is made by collecting the stalk fractions of gyokuro and sencha and processed to an emerald leaf and pale green stalk blend. The leaves go on to make gyokuro and high graded sencha. Kukicha is known for its light flavor and fresh green aroma with a very light yellow-green color.

--amRadioHed 19:29, 1 November 2006 (UTC)


I saw that the current photo is of a more green-looking tea than I'm used to seeing, which is usually just brown stems, roasted.

--Cbrunning (talk) 05:22, 28 September 2008 (UTC)

Hi, Cbrunning. The roasted Japanese tea is Hojicha. Some sort of Hojicha is made from Kukicha. Karigane, excellent Kukicha, look more white-green while cheap one look more brown-green. I wish you would enjoy your tea life. --Kurihaya (talk) 07:29, 16 July 2009 (UTC)

Reference[edit]

The article references “Rosa, Dominik M.D.-Dyngus Day Grand Marshal”. But I can't seem to find out anything about this book or article nor its author. All my googling only indicates that this information has been copied around verbatim. I would suggest removing the reference if nobody can substantiate it. Hanche (talk) 17:52, 25 August 2009 (UTC)