Talk:Lady Day

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Palm Sunday and Lady Day[edit]

If Palm Sunday occurs on the same day as Lady Day, as it did in 1945, which term takes precedence? 86.133.214.44 09:26, 6 March 2007 (UTC)

Traditional?[edit]

Where, or by whom, is this traditional? I've never heard of it. Bogomir Kovacs (talk) 16:44, 10 August 2009 (UTC)

19 November 2009[edit]

19th November 2009 Ladies Day Is this the same Lady?

http://www.radiosai.org/pages/thought.asp, Sai Baba, Thought for the Day, 19th November 2009

-- 88.75.214.166 (talk) 08:31, 19 November 2009 (UTC)

Sathya Sai Baba Declared ‘Ladies Day’ On November 19th 1995 origin of that Day.

~~ 88.75.197.189 (talk) 10:52, 19 November 2009 (UTC)

Well, some information has to be added on this day, too. http://www.srisathyasai.org.in/, maybe not as an external link.

-- 88.75.193.243 (talk) 13:19, 20 November 2009 (UTC)

Changes made September 2011[edit]

I've made some modest changes. The term 'Lady Day' is most certainly not traditional in Ireland. It was used in law by the British colonial administration as a quarter day, but was not and is not used in most parts of Ireland to mean the feast of the Annunciation either in English or in Gaelic.

The article was very anglo-centric, and also failed to distinguish between Christian liturgical calendars, most obviously by ignoring the existence of the Eastern liturgical calendar completely. PrivateWiddle (talk) 13:46, 17 September 2011 (UTC)

Crucial Point Thus Far Omitted[edit]

So up until 1752, in all official documents and records of, for instance, the British government, the date 1XXX on documents in January, February, and up until March 25 actually took place in the year 1XXX+1. This is a huge fact for historians, and should be the most important fact established by this article, yet it is barely to be inferred here. Mandrakos (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 02:46, 27 November 2013 (UTC)

Fasting[edit]

Do Lady Days have a connection, in Medieval times, with fasting? Martinevans123 (talk) 12:58, 28 February 2014 (UTC)