Talk:Laffer curve

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Terminology[edit]

What is a "stylized graph?" I have degrees in math and engineering, and have never heard of such a thing; neither does a Google search turn up any significant hits. Perhaps this should just read "graph?"

vague[edit]

"There is serious doubt about the relevance considering a single marginal tax rate."

The relevance of what? Of considering a marginal tax rate? Of the curve? Vague. Surely the curve. But needs clarity.

Records and Analysis[edit]

Lawrence, there is a difference between simple records and analysis.

An academic study says, "things must be this way."

Simple record says, "this happened."

A record doesn't say, "what happened could not have been otherwise" but rather "this happened to occur." It's like saying "Babe Ruth happened to have a lot of strike outs during his period of home run hits." Almost anything can serve as a source for the latter, and since this is a simple matter of record, I really don't care WHAT source you want to use. It's just boring news about 2000s tax revenues that HAPPENED to agree with the theory predicted by Hsing in the 1990s. Let's not war about the news, but work together until you're okay with it.SkyWriter (Tim) (talk)

Just to be clear -- I'm not interested in an edit war, but rather looking for how to collaborate on something non-controversial. The controversy is in the theory of what must and should optimize tax revenue (which involves academic sources). The non-controversial material is the simple history of what levels have experienced maximum revenues so far. That's no more controversial than Babe Ruth's batting average. It says nothing about what must or should occur, but rather reports on what has so far. Since the record happens to fall within the range of one academic source already listed in the article, and the Romer paper I added, it is certainly of interest in the article. There's no reason not to list it, and if maximum revenues change to correspond to a different academic theory, then it's a simple matter of updating it.SkyWriter (Tim) (talk)

A tad Americocentric?[edit]

Obviously, the term originated in the USA, but do you not feel that the article gets just a little bogged down in US domestic policy,with insufficient explanation of its universal implications and impact around the globe? Jatrius (talk) 10:31, 29 April 2014 (UTC)

Needed in the lede: On what the the Laffer Curve actually is[edit]

In the 35 years since I first heard of the Laffer Curve during Reagan's run for President, I'm routinely amazed at how many people don't recognize what the Curve actually is. Even back in 1980, when the talking head nitwits on TV acted as if the Laffer Curve had arrived to us on a stone tablet from on high, I couldn't understand why no one realized that it's just the lower half of the supply/demand curve diagram that every college student learns in his freshman year. (I'm actually never surprised when TV's talking heads don't know something, as they never seem to know much about anything.) I would think that this rather obvious fact should be someplace in the article, probably in the lede.

Also, In reading the talk pages in the Archives, I've noticed several people stating that people would continue to work if the taxation rate were 100%. Really? If there are any people out there who are willing to work for free then I will gladly hire them on. If these people are willing to give 100% of their earnings to the government then they shouldn't mind giving it all back to me. Why do people say such ridiculous things? (It also stupidly ignores the fact that at an oppressive tax rate people would only work if they were paid under the table.)__209.179.51.170 (talk) 03:17, 18 September 2014 (UTC)