Talk:Lake St. Clair

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WP:LAKES[edit]

Older commentary[edit]

I just wanted to point out that I think it's pretty silly that this article is at Lake Saint Clair, North America. This article should be at Lake Saint Clair or Lake St. Clair given that (a) this lake crosses an international border (making it a significant lake), (b) the other Lake Saint Clairs don't even have their own articles yet, (c) this lake is part of the Great Lakes system, which makes it significant (you wouldn't put Lake Geneva at Lake Geneva, Europe or Lake Geneva, France and Switzerland), even though there is a Lake Geneva, Wisconsin and a Lake Geneva, Florida). Darkcore 09:16, 2 Apr 2004 (UTC)


I disagree. Lake Saint Clair requires a qualifier as it is not the only Lake Saint Clair in North America. It should be moved and renamed as Lake Saint Clair (Michigan-Ontario) similar to Pigeon River (Minnesota-Ontario) which also acts as the international border between Canada and the United States. That fact that it is part of the Great Lakes of North America is not a strong argument.--BrentS 16:07, 4 Jan 2005 (UTC)

BrentS's argument seems pretty convincing to me. I would also note that I have never seen "Saint" spelled out, so I vote for Lake St. Clair (Michigan-Ontario). —Rodii 8 July 2005 21:29 (UTC)
I agree with Rodii, I live on the lake and no one spells out Saint. It should be titled as Lake St. Clair(e). I live in Stoney Point so it is predominantly french speaking, hence the 'e'. The-Rob 00:14, 10 January 2007 (UTC)
I agree with Darkcore; this is an international lake. This fact alone qualifies it for (North America). All other lakes by this name can take a more precise local name such as country/state/province or other region qualifier. Being part of the Great Lakes I think is a strong argument due to the basin's uniqueness. In fact, I would be of mind to recommend that Pigeon River be renamed to (North America), unless there are any other Pigeon Rivers on the border between say New Brunswick and Maine. The other alternative would be to use (Canada-USA) for both articles.Em3rald 19:52, 3 July 2006 (UTC)
Lake Saint Clair, North America doesn't cut it for me - it seems to be applicable to the other Lake St.Clairs just as much as this one. I agree that the title needs a modifier, so I would support Lake St. Clair (Michigan-Ontario)PKT 01:34, 13 August 2006 (UTC)
Someone needs to explain the titling of this article and the redirection from "Lake St. Clair." I can't find "Lake Saint Clair" on any maps showing the southern Ontario/southern Michigan region. I've lived within a hour of the lake for over 60 years and it's never been anything but Lake St. Clair. Wikipedia's article on the river feeding into it from Lake Huron is correctly titled St. Clair River; where the text also uses "Lake St. Clair" as the anchor text to link to this page! Leaving it with Saint spelled out is beyond wrong - it's plain silly! Rodii, and others above, have it right. How many citations does it take to have this fixed? Lyn (talk) 04:14, 20 September 2012 (UTC)


Grosse Pointes[edit]

The Grosse Pointes are eastern suburbs of Detroit, not northern ones. They are due east of the city. Also, they cover only about a quarter of the Michigan shore of the lake--the rest lies in Macomb and St. Clair counties. Before I edited it, the article gave the impression that the entire Michigan side was closed off to the public, which is entirely false--there are multiple public beaches, most notably Metro Beach.

Reference given maybe wrong[edit]

The reference given [1] maybe incorrect or at least have a typo and thereby be unrelieable. It says the lake is in Minnesota. It may need to be removed. --MJCdetroit 03:10, 2 October 2006 (UTC)

Fixed. It was linking to the wrong lake. It should link to the right one, now. --Elliskev 21:06, 9 October 2007 (UTC)
Maybe "maybe" may be "may be". 169.139.19.207 (talk) 19:11, 22 December 2011 (UTC)

Bad References / Merge? / Lake Michigan-Huron?[edit]

References [2] and [3] given in the article require passworded accounts to look at them. I do not know all Wikipedia's rules, but it seems to me it ain't much of a reference if you can't look at it. Perhaps they should be updated or removed as references. I do not know how to do this.

Perhaps the discussion of St. Clair's status as a "Great Lake" should be moved into that article, where there is no mention of it? Since the lake (only) covers 1,270 sq km it doesn't fit the top twenty, but it is certainly a "great" lake if you have stood on the shore and looked at it.

One thing that tweaked my nose on the Great Lakes article is that some geologists have proposed calling Michigan and Huron one lake, "Lake Michigan-Huron," because they are "hydrologically connected."

I cannot find a definition for that mouthful of academic double-talk: I found thirty thousand different definitions for it on AltaVista alone for "hydrologically connected." Two massive lakes connected only by the small Straits of Mackinac don't seem to my uneducated little pinhead as "Hydrologically connected."

Moreover, -being- from Michigan, I have never heard anyone from Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, or Ontario refer to them as "Lake Michigan-Huron." Who gets to name features? Academics, or the people who live there?

-J. Kulacz 96.18.50.143 (talk) 22:53, 29 April 2008 (UTC)

I agree about the invalidity of the password-protected references. They don't allow the article's readers to verify the content of the article so they're no use.
I don't know the full definition of "hydrologically connected" but, in this case, it means that the two lakes' surfaces are at the same level and that water can and does flow in both directions between them. As such, if you're studying lakes and how they work, it's better to consider them as a single lake with a very narrow bit in the middle. If you're considering it as a single lake, it's much easier to say "Lake Michigan–Huron" than something like "the Lake Michigan—Lake Huron system". On the other hand, for general usage, it makes much more sense to call the parts to the east of the narrow bit Lake Huron and the parts to the west, Lake Michigan, just as has always been done. By analogy, we call the ocean to the west of the USA the Pacific and the ocean to the east, the Atlantic, even though they're the same body of water. Not sure why you're asking about this here, though — there's no mention of Michigan–Huron in the article. Dricherby (talk) 12:52, 23 December 2008 (UTC)
I've put a verification failed tag against the password-protected sources. I don't think that's quite the right thing to do but I can't find anything more appropriate. If anyone has a better way of handling this, please go ahead! Dricherby (talk) 13:10, 23 December 2008 (UTC)
Regarding the sources -- being password-protected does not invalidate the reference. Suppose the same reference was given to a print article without the hyperlink -- would that invalidate the reference? The provided info is minimal, but it would likely be sufficient to retrieve the article from a library with an archive of the newspaper and it is enough to retrieve the article for a fee from the newpaper's online archives. olderwiser 02:28, 28 December 2008 (UTC)

Good article on Great Lakes levels[edit]

Lynch, Jim, November 08. 2010 Low Great Lakes levels prompt new call for action: U.S., Canada look at options to slow flow out of Lake Huron Detroit News. 7&6=thirteen (talk) 23:44, 8 November 2010 (UTC) Stan

Coincidence[edit]

"This lake is situated about 6.0 miles (9.7 km) northeast of Detroit, Michigan and Windsor, Ontario." Very peculiar. I never realized that Detroit and Windsor actually occupied the same location. 169.139.19.207 (talk) 18:59, 22 December 2011 (UTC)

Move discussion in progress[edit]

There is a move discussion in progress on Talk:Lake Saint Clair which affects this page. Please participate on that page and not in this talk page section. Thank you. —RMCD bot 10:29, 5 August 2013 (UTC)