Talk:Land value tax in the United States

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New Valuable Source[edit]

LAND VALUE TAXATION: THEORY, EVIDENCE, AND PRACTICE edited by Richard F. Dye and Richard W. England.

Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-1-55844-185-9 1. Land value taxation. I. Dye, Richard F. II. England, Richard W. III. Lincoln Institute of Land Policy. HJ4165.L375 2009 336.22′5—dc22 2009007248

This has quite a bit of information as well as biblographical references.70.22.35.192 (talk) 17:25, 29 May 2009 (UTC)

https://www.lincolninst.edu/pubs/dl/1568_856_Web%20Chapter.pdf96.234.194.138 (talk) 15:29, 18 September 2009 (UTC)

Propose to delete this entire section[edit]

Legality[edit]

This section is fallacious and should be deleted. Dillon's Rule is not a problem; many States have Home Rule yet they have not adopted LVT. Alabama, where I live has Dillon's Rule and there is a two rate tax system at both the County and Municipal level. The obstacle is a lack of will or knowledge of how to implement LVT.

Citations:[1] http://www.brookings.edu/reports/2003/01metropolitanpolicy_richardson.aspx

[2] http://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=A0geu9MMLMFJGIgAV5lXNyoA?p=dillon%27s+rule+%26++home+rule&y=Search&fr=yfp-t-501-s

DAB (talk) 17:52, 18 March 2009 (UTC)

LVT can still exist alongside Dillon's rule; it just means that the tax needs to be specifically authorized by the state. Like Alabama, Connecticut has Dillon's rule — but since there is no specific authorization for the tax, it prevents New London from enacting LVT on its own.[1] --Explodicle (T/C) 19:30, 18 March 2009 (UTC)

New London has a property tax - http://ci.new-london.ct.us/content/27/49/554/default.aspx . LVT can be implemented - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land_value_tax_in_the_United_States#Two-rate_taxation .

DAB (talk) 18:19, 24 March 2009 (UTC)

Are you saying that New London currently employs or has the right to employ two-rate taxation? The links you just posted do not verify that. --Explodicle (T/C) 19:28, 24 March 2009 (UTC)

We can find out from the tax assessor - mfarrell@ci.new-london.ct.us <mfarrell@ci.new-london.ct.us> I think LVT could be implemented there, anyway.

BTW, did you notice what the Brookings Institute said in the link I gave above? "In sum, localities-rather than blaming Dillon's Rule for the shortcomings of growth management-need to reexamine their own regulations..." —Preceding unsigned comment added by Dab295 (talkcontribs) 18:09, 25 March 2009 (UTC)

Personal emails are not reliable sources and can't be used in articles. I did read the Brookings summary; it says that in the context of growth management, home rule isn't as important as statewide reform and existing local options like zoning. The authors aren't saying that a city can just ignore Dillon's Rule, they are saying that there are other ways to control growth than localized taxes.
This bill started out as enabling legislation to allow municipalities to adopt LVT (which would otherwise be illegal because of Dillon's Rule) and has since evolved into a pilot program to test out LVT before more widespread use. In both iterations, authorization from the state is required for local adoption of LVT. --Explodicle (T/C) 00:21, 26 March 2009 (UTC)

In correspondence with Steven Cord, an expert on LTV cited in the main article, he said, "Dillon's Rule doesn't seem to be an obstacle for us"... He can be reached via the citation for confirmation or by email, "steven cord" <stevencord2000@yahoo.com> http://www.economicboom.info/about_director.htm DAB (talk) 17:38, 8 April 2009 (UTC)

Personal emails are still not reliable sources. Steven Cord would have to at least blog about it or make some other public statement for us to cover this. --Explodicle (T/C) 14:33, 15 April 2009 (UTC)
I think that Dr. Cord was also quoted out of context. First, Dillon's Rule was not a problem for his work in the 70s, 80s, and 90s, inducing nearly 2 dozen jurisdictions in PA to use two-rate taxation. Second, Dillon's rule is not insurmountable because all that is needed where that obstacle exists is enabling legislation.96.234.194.138 (talk) 15:33, 18 September 2009 (UTC)

HGFA and CSE[edit]

Should these be even referenced any more. The State land value projects have been abandoned (the sites no longer work so I removed the reference) and it's not clear that the organizations are much more than a one man shop.71.166.112.119 (talk) 21:49, 20 July 2009 (UTC)

The Henry George Foundation of America web page has been broken for many months. I've removed the references to these organizations since they don't appear really to be relevant to the topic. 96.234.194.138 (talk) 15:46, 18 September 2009 (UTC)

Create box insert with rates used in PA[edit]

I don't know how to do this. But from this cite below which has appropriate governmental sourcing. The actually rates used in the Pennsylvania jurisdictions are presented. I think it would best be presenting in an "insert box" but I don't know how to do that. I think the article is really incomplete without the rates and therefore should be added by a competant wikiologist or whatever you call yourselves.

http://ourcommonwealth.org/news/lvt-jurisdiction-rates

96.234.193.62 (talk) 14:37, 19 October 2010 (UTC)

Copy of Atty General Opinion available[edit]

http://www.oag.state.md.us/Opinions/1995/80OAG316.pdf

The Md. Atty Gen Op is available here. So the footnote needs to be updated. I don't know how to properly do this. 96.234.193.62 (talk) 15:07, 19 October 2010 (UTC)
Cite error: There are <ref> tags on this page, but the references will not show without a {{reflist}} template (see the help page).